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The Art of Avoiding Work

Another example. from ancient Egypt. In ancient tombs the walls are painted with nice representations of ancient life etc. Thing is the painters did not bother to move the furniture. If there was a chair or bookcase against the wall they just painted around it and left a blank wall behind. The inspector was also too lazy to move the furniture so everyone was happy. Afte 4,000 years the painters union in Egypt said it is too late to file a grievance for sloppy work.
Bill D.
 
Western productivity is at an all time low while the paper pushers at the top, have more assistants then ever and more meeting sthen ever accomplishing nothing...taking bonuses.
Any source on this? Everything I see says the exact opposite.



 
Any source on this? Everything I see says the exact opposite.





I will try and find the article I read. It was based on manufacturing being a smaller and smaller percentage of our economies and how the big shift to Banking/financials, stocks, insurance and other paper pushing services, and government jobs are making up larger and larger portions of the jobs in our economies.

I know government jobs at the federal level here in Canada has grown by 40% or more in the last 8 years.
 
It was based on manufacturing being a smaller and smaller percentage of our economies

Here in the U.S. there are 13 million manufacturing workers and that number has grown every year since 2010. The output of U.S. manufacturing has also been steadily increasing since 2010.

Sorry to hear that things are getting worse in Canada.
 
Here in the U.S. there are 13 million manufacturing workers and that number has grown every year since 2010. The output of U.S. manufacturing has also been steadily increasing since 2010.

Sorry to hear that things are getting worse in Canada.
Unfortunately that doesn't tell the whole story. We still have less manufacturing jobs in the US than in 2008, and just 3.8% of the population works in manufacturing now.1718707444373.png
 
Unfortunately that doesn't tell the whole story.

Fair enough.

Your graph got me wondering about other professions. One that surprised me is that the number of federal government workers has been flat for 50 years:
federal workers.png

I'm having the best year ever. Orders just keep rolling in. Also, looking around it seems that guys who make stuff are generally in strong demand.

How's business for you?
 
Let me explain how trickle down economics has worked for me.

An engineer at a good customer, who many times commented on how good trickle down economics is, asked for a quote on a decent sized project. He called me to discuss the quote and commented that he thought it was high. I said that I too believe in trickle down economics and was trying to make lots of money so I also could trickle some down.

Got the job.
 
Unfortunately that doesn't tell the whole story. We still have less manufacturing jobs in the US than in 2008, and just 3.8% of the population works in manufacturing now.View attachment 443930
If you want to know what's going on with manufacturing, look at what happened to agriculture starting about 1900. Manufacturing is following a similar trajectory, except this time, there's nowhere for the displaced workers to go. We already have a surfeit of college grads, with many unable to obtain the work their level of education suggests they're able to do. Notice the income level for these grads has been dropping on an absolute scale.
 
Manufacturing is following a similar trajectory

How do you explain the fact that the number of manufacturing workers in the US has increased every year for the past decade and a half?

We already have a surfeit of college grads, with many unable to obtain the work their level of education suggests they're able to do.

Yup it's getting harder and harder to find a job doing keg stands and sleeping late.
 
Look farther back: manufacturing declined from a peak in 1979, and it's still down about a third from that level.

Look at little further back. There are 41% more manufacturing jobs today than there were in 1940.

That's very different from the number of farm workers which decreased dramatically from 1930 to 1990, but has been steady for the past 35 years.
 
If you want to know what's going on with manufacturing, look at what happened to agriculture starting about 1900. Manufacturing is following a similar trajectory, except this time, there's nowhere for the displaced workers to go. We already have a surfeit of college grads, with many unable to obtain the work their level of education suggests they're able to do. Notice the income level for these grads has been dropping on an absolute scale.

I don't know that I have ever heard that issue to have come to pass yet (until now) but I have expected that for some time. No surprise here.


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I am Ox and I approve this here post!
 
Look at little further back. There are 41% more manufacturing jobs today than there were in 1940.

That's very different from the number of farm workers which decreased dramatically from 1930 to 1990, but has been steady for the past 35 years.
Take a look at this chart from BLS. Numbers are in thousands. Interesting that we are roughly equal to post WW2 levels. How many would there be if things followed increase in population as a percentage. It doesn't break out machining but if it did, I think we know what would be revealed.
1721581340958.png
 
I don't know that I have ever heard that issue to have come to pass yet (until now) but I have expected that for some time. No surprise here.


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I am Ox and I approve this here post!
Ox, Shirley you've heard, or read, about HR depts requiring a degree for positions that don't require it. Soon, you'll need an MBA to be a barista. Better yet, we can watch the lawyers duke it out with the MBA's for those barista spots.
 
Sadly there is nothing clever, or made up about that. 🤣 That is daily life in big corporations. They break up every decision and every task into so many pieces that no one, single person is ever responsible for anything. That way nobody gets in trouble. Government too. The people organizing the meetings are considered the ones "getting things done." Management views them to be the leaders and put them in charge of ever-growing projects. Their underlings begin to set up meetings to prepare things for the larger meetings. They will seriously have "dry run" meetings where they will go over everything in advance of the real, actual meeting with the customer.
Ah meetings, where the minutes are kept and the hours are lost.
 
In the late 1940s, my dad worked every summer to pay for college. In those days you could walk into the Gary Indiana plant of US Steel, and be working the next day.
First day on the job, the old timers came up to him and explained how to Avoid Work, which, they told him, was not a choice, as, if he made the rest of them look bad, he would get beat up AND fired.
So they showed him where in the gigantic mill to hide, which times and places to make token appearances, and how to go along to get along. He didnt mind- he read a few books a week, and sitting behind a giant pile of rolls of steel, reading, while getting paid, was just fine with him.
40,000 employees worked at that steel mill in those days.
He had similar stories about the season he spent installing seats in Studebakers on the production line.
Avoiding work is a tradition that goes back thousands of years.
When America was Great the first time, they had a system. Now, you have to google it and do it on your own.
Both instances were the result of poor supervision. I worked at many places where people were able to produce a decent day's work without killing themselves.

"I'm not afraid of work. I can stand real close to it".

"Work fascinates me. I can stare at it for hours".
 
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