What's new
What's new

Tips in general, little discussion , just the tips,

Always check dimensions with two different methods when possible.


IDK about always, but I doo use this as best that I can when running large / tight tol features.

I have found that I trust the accuracy of my (recently deceased) 24" digi calipers more than I doo a large mic.
The large mic I trust most when laid down on the bench, and I bring an inside mic over to measure. (used as a telescoping gauge - rather than an actual mic) But when you start trying to handle 18" (24", 30") mics, and try to git a feel for zero, it is more like a wet noodle. When trying to run a bearing bore or journal, the mic is hard to feel secure about within tenths, so having another method to compare to is highly beneficial.


-----------------

Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 
The clear film (cellophane) of a cigarette pack makes a very useful shim often being .001 or so.
Good to have some in your toolbox for surface grinding and other fine shim needs.
When shim stock isn't available, the side of an aluminum soda can is usually .002 to .003 depending on brand. Thickness is quite consistent.
I have often cut the top off with snips, then cut vertical stripes with regular scissors.
Works great to shim or protect a small part in a chuck or vise.
 
IDK about always, but I doo use this as best that I can when running large / tight tol features.

I have found that I trust the accuracy of my (recently deceased) 24" digi calipers more than I doo a large mic.
The large mic I trust most when laid down on the bench, and I bring an inside mic over to measure. (used as a telescoping gauge - rather than an actual mic) But when you start trying to handle 18" (24", 30") mics, and try to git a feel for zero, it is more like a wet noodle. When trying to run a bearing bore or journal, the mic is hard to feel secure about within tenths, so having another method to compare to is highly beneficial.


-----------------

Think Snow Eh!
Ox
I should have been a little more specific about it mainly being for tighter tolerances.
 
When shim stock isn't available, the side of an aluminum soda can is usually .002 to .003 depending on brand. Thickness is quite consistent.
I have often cut the top off with snips, then cut vertical stripes with regular scissors.
Works great to shim or protect a small part in a chuck or vise.
And in a punch with no shim one can grind off .0005 or what, to let the part tip over a little, that much when fliped ground-tip-side down on the magnetic chuck.
But yes , you have to figure how that affects the other sides.
 
In a follow up to OX's last statement.
I also use large (12"-40" which is as big as I currently have unless I go to the vernier caliper) outside micrometers only in conjunction with an internal mic to verify size on any tighter tolerance parts. I also do this in the reverse when using Internal micrometer and verify with the outside micrometers. Plus I check my mic with a standard that same day to check for thermal gain or shrink.
 
If you put an M00 or M01 in code, include a comment so when the operator wakes up from doom-scrolling, they know what's next. Flip the part? Which way? Put some lube in the hole? Etc.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ox
If you put an M00 or M01 in code, include a comment so when the operator wakes up from doom-scrolling, they know what's next. Flip the part? Which way? Put some lube in the hole? Etc.

On the lathe, my most used app for this is to check a size and adjust.
So the next line I just use an EOB, and the next line I put the size expected for pre-finish value, or the range for the finish size if final pass.


------------------

Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 








 
Back
Top