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Titan is peddling Syil?

One good example of multiple channels pushing the same stuff is a YT channel called The Fast Lane Truck. They have multiple accounts pushing more or less similar content..
I've noticed this as well and that was a good example. To add to it, the content is rarely worth watching. "What's better, an OBS 7.3 Powerstroke or a 2023 6.7 Powerstroke?". I see video titles like that and actually start to gag a little. Sort of like when you say "almond milk".

It's just a desperation for clicks. I read a quote recently: If a headline (can typically be applied to a YouTube title) ends in a question mark, the answer is "no".
 
I've noticed this as well and that was a good example. To add to it, the content is rarely worth watching. "What's better, an OBS 7.3 Powerstroke or a 2023 6.7 Powerstroke?". I see video titles like that and actually start to gag a little. Sort of like when you say "almond milk".

It's just a desperation for clicks. I read a quote recently: If a headline (can typically be applied to a YouTube title) ends in a question mark, the answer is "no".
Another clickbait tactic is the "YouTube face" or "YouTube reaction face". Many content creators put a person with a screaming face, or otherwise melodramatic face, on the thumbnail because there is a perception that such images generate interest / clicks. Titans does this sometimes.

At our local Tech college (via Milwaukee Public Television) I took a course on videography and editing (Adobe Premiere Pro) geared towards creating content for social media. In this course we were told of all the little tricks and tactics people use to generate clicks. Clickbaits were quite frowned upon. The course tried to teach us on creating content that avoided such dubious (or scummy) behavior.


One of the best YT channels for metalworking is by Swedish blacksmith Torbjörn Åhman. He doesn't resort to clickbaits, doesn't sell products and doesn't faff about just to extend the video for the sake of making a longer video. He rarely speaks and just lets his work provide the entertainment and information. Here is a guy that I would say is one of the gold standards on how to create honest and interesting 'maker' videos.

@RicFurrer and other blacksmiths are no doubt familiar with him.


Torbjörn has 726K subs, without resorting cringe-worthy tactics.

This is his website, with bio.
 
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On their podcast channel: start watching around 23:20. He says the Syil machines are better than a lot of the 50k -60k machines. He then goes on to say it is below the Doosan.
I noticed that earlier and rolled my eyes.

No shit it's below Doosan. The funny thing is the Doosan is probably 65K so it falls just outside.
 
****Disclamer: I'm all for more shops and more entrepreneurs outer there trying to make it on their own. But...*****

I think the sad part about all of this here is now you will get a bunch of people who go out and buy these thinking it will be ****EASY**** to start, run and grown a business. Just buy a machine and make parts and everything will be unicorns puking rainbows and shitting butterflys all day. Easy money. The fact of the matter is there is SOOOOOOOOOOOO much more to a machining business than the machines you own and these people will have to learn the hard way through their own time and money instead of.....

Being hired on at good shops at good wages by good people with good business/machining sense and learning all those hard expensive lessons on someone else's dime while saving money to get a machine more suited. I remember being 20 something and thinking I knew enough to start my own shop and yada yada I know it all but I am so glad that I got to learn from great people and luckily they taught me and luckily I listened. I would have been doomed without that sage advice and experience I have learned along the way.

IMHO the industry would be better served overall if the next generation of shop owners had more than a few years of machining under their belt when they decide to start a shop. So this just seems like more marketing directed at poeple who know just enough to be dangerous and have a big enough HELOC to buy a machine. BOOM!
Yup. And not just on "someone else's machine" but largely *with good examples to follow*

When I first dove into this (after a career elsewhere) there was no youtube, and no PM - it was usenet and some magazines. PM helps a fair amount. Youtube shares a lot of tacit information sort of like what you'd get working side by side with somebody.

Community college/trade school/etc. should be just full of that.

But aside from some (pretty good) podcasts, most of the real business issues are things which must be solved by the business. (This is part of why people buy into franchises - there's a model to work from better than 'from scratch')

I still regularly see material that makes it clear to me that people don't understand how patents work, how selling at retail works (not sure I grok that either), how leases work, how insurance works, etc. etc.

Surely more shops fail because they couldn't actually collect money from "customers" than fail because they bought the wrong endmill.
 
This guy went on to get another beginner machine.
The syil ? It's not a noob machine. It's a lowish-end commercial vmc. There's a little bit different attitude in a lot of shops in china. They do low-cost work, they buy low-cost stuff, use it up, throw it away. They don't fall in love with their tools, they just use them to make money.

And contrary to some opinions, buying the most expensive thing on the planet is not always the road to where the streets are paved with gold.

The machine itself is probably at least as good as a minimill. Has other drawbacks but components-wise and performance-wise, I'd bet it stacks up fine. Earlier there's a zeiss cmm printout, look at the numbers. (The program he created the part with was ghastly, so it's actually a credit to the machine the numbers came out that well).
 
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Our Okuma rep (Gosiger) carries that brand.

Jing Diao is a serious machine tool company.

Well, more accurately - Jing Diao is a Chinese government initiative to insert themselves into the global machine tool industry by subsidizing massive amounts of R&D and gain market share by undercutting the competition at loss-leader pricing.

The government affiliation is clearly indicated on their own About Us page by noting an investment from the government as their main milestone in the last 20 years.
 
"YouTube Face" or YouTube Reaction Face" clickbait thumbnail.

Here is Titans' latest
youtube 1.jpg

One of the most egregious practicers of this clickbait tactic is the automotive channel Donut Media
youtube 2.jpg

TFL Truck also does it
youtube 3.jpg

Scotty Kilmer (automotive channel) is especially bad in utilizing clickbait titles and misleading headlines. He has 6 million subs but still does this.
 
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Another clickbait tactic is the "YouTube face" or "YouTube reaction face". Many content creators put a person with a screaming face, or otherwise melodramatic face, on the thumbnail because there is a perception that such images generate interest / clicks. Titans does this sometimes.
Pierson Workholding is really bad with the faces. Which is unfortunate, because it goes against his whole "calm and collected" Lean persona. I use a couple of their products and like some of his tips videos, but the click bait is a bit much.
 
My dad has a standing policy that if he ever tries to start a restaurant, we're to have him committed.
Most small businesses are a joke. No wonder four out of five startups fail within five years.

Trying to make a sincere living with goofy shit like a coffee shop, café, local restaurant, clothing store, pool and spa store, antique store, vape and tobacco shop, fitness gym...it's all just folly with maybe one out of twenty providing a valid, decent living for the owner.

Spending a bunch of money on advertising, marketing, inventory, signage...and then just hoping the public will show up and spend money: crazier than hell if you ask me! There is always going to be a competitor spending more on advertising, trying to make a go.

Give me a business like machining every single time, where I can go out to the potential customers (and keep going) until work rolls in. Customers often become regular repeat customers, we don't have to deal with the idiotic public, we sell to other companies who understand how much shit costs, etc.

ToolCat
 
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Most small businesses are a joke. No wonder four out of five startups fail within five years.

Trying to make a sincere living with goofy shit like a coffee shop, café, local restaurant, clothing store, pool and spa store, antique store, vape and tobacco shop, fitness gym...it's all just folly with maybe one out of twenty providing a valid, decent living for the owner.

Spending a bunch of money on advertising, marketing, inventory, square footage...and then just hoping the public will show up and spend money: crazier than hell if you ask me! There is always going to be a competitor spending more on advertising, trying to make a go.

Give me a business like machining every single time, where I can go out to the potential customers (and keep going) until work rolls in. Customers become regular repeat customers, we don't have to deal with the idiotic public, we sell to other companies who understand how much shit costs, etc.

ToolCat
Does anyone wonder how those stores that exclusively sell Halloween items manage to survive?
 
Off Topic: Why do soo many YT content creators make multiple channels all pushing similar content? Why not put everything on one channel? I reckon they are milking their subscriptions for as much as they can? They figure all the people who subscribed to their main channel will also subscribe to their newer channels. One good example of multiple channels pushing the same stuff is a YT channel called The Fast Lane Truck. They have multiple accounts pushing more or less similar content.

My understanding of this is the YT algorithm, and pay structure, is influenced not only by views but also by viewer engagement. From the podcast side of things, the viewer base for titans 10 minute BOOM videos are a lot different than a long form podcast (I, for one, hate podcasts). If you keep them all on the same channel, you now have podcast viewers not engaged with normal vids and normal vid viewers only watching 5 minutes of a podcast, or some small amount. Engagement gets dragged down and youtube doesn't like you. Same story with the TFL guys. People interested in trucks may not be interested in SUV content or car content or whatever non truck content. So while its all roughly the same material, its different enough that the lack of viewer engagement from one would drag down the other. So they split them across multiple channels.
 








 
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