What's new
What's new

V1 of my hydraulic angle iron shear failed. Would appreciate any feedback so I can design a better V2.

David916

Aluminum
Joined
Jul 5, 2020
Tried to make it from scrap parts, and realized a few problems after my first test in trying to shear 1.5" angle.


Problem 1: The base is too flimsy. I made it from two separate pieces of flat bar tacked together, and both opposite ends buckled towards the center.

Solution: Weld everything down to 1/2" plate so it's stable.

Problem 2: Over beveled blade. I beveled it at about 65 degrees and maybe should've tried it when it was flat and at 45 degrees to see what would happen? After attempting to shear the 1.5" angle and failing, i noticed the center point had rounded over and is deformed. Maybe it needs some more meat to it to it's stronger?

Solution: I can put it back on the mill and flatten it a bit but don't know at what degree? Also, the blade is made from mild steel and is not heat treated. Should I heat treat it, and if so, anyone know of a way to do it with basic-ish tools?

Problem 3: The end of the workpiece that isn't being cut is lifting. I clamped it down with welding clamps and it still wants to lift.

Solution: I'll install a bar handle screw on top of the workpiece and crank it down into the center of the angle iron to firmly secure it in place.


I'm using a 40 ton hydraulic cylinder at 2,700 psi. Do you think this is enough power? The maximum size angle I'd like to cut is 2.5" at .1875" thick.

If anyone notices additional issues with this die, please let me know and a possible solution(s).

Any feedback is appreciated.

Many thanks and Happy Holidays,
Dave
 

Attachments

  • 20231203_192046.jpg
    20231203_192046.jpg
    1.3 MB · Views: 49
  • 20231203_191258.jpg
    20231203_191258.jpg
    1.4 MB · Views: 49
  • 20231203_191308.jpg
    20231203_191308.jpg
    1.5 MB · Views: 49
  • 20231203_191538.jpg
    20231203_191538.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 46
  • 20231203_192328.jpg
    20231203_192328.jpg
    1.4 MB · Views: 46
  • 20231203_191607.jpg
    20231203_191607.jpg
    1.6 MB · Views: 46
  • 20231203_192303.jpg
    20231203_192303.jpg
    943.7 KB · Views: 49
Retrain your eyes to see 1/2 plate as sheet metal. You need a lot more… everything.
Blade angles are square (reversible!)
Blades are hard, harder than ms is going to get.
Thanks. I will rebuild with thicker plate and remove the angle from the blade so it's flat, heat treat it, and try again.

If the blade is still too soft, what material would you suggest?
 
Cutting edge shouldn't try to engage all surfaces simultaneously. Shears typically start at one edge and work across, like a scissor.
ah, great observation. I'll do some more research and maybe figure out a design so one half of the angle is cut before the other.
 
Buy an old mechanical shear for scrap price ,and cut up steel for evermore ......a 15-20 ton inclinable press will cut up steel that size as fast as you can feed it in.
 
whoa...
1/2" x 15" x 15" D2 plate steel is $284 on eBay.

Really starting to wonder if i remove the angle from the mild steel blade and harden it, if it'll be strong enough to cut through .1875" thick x 2" angle iron ?
 
Have you heard the one about when man was created. When they said what kind of head would you like he thought they said beds so he asked for a big soft one. When they said ears he thought they said beers so asked for big ones. Use those and listen to what has been said. Mild steel does not harden. Big expensive die blocks. Heel blocks. Good guidance. Basically what you are building is a really weak flanging die that will pick up after 2 strokes if you get that far. Go buy a die design book and save a lot of wasted time.
 
. . . if i remove the angle from the mild steel blade and harden it. . .
It won't harden! You could 'case' harden it or apply a hard-facing weld but those won't hold up either. You don't need tool steel for the base or frame, just for the cradle and blade.

D2 is great material, but it isn't forgiving with regard to heat-treat. I send that out to pro shops. If you are not an experienced operator with special equipment, I dare say you'll be disappointed with the result of home-grown hardening of D2.

I also suspect you'll have problems shearing 2 1/2 @ 3/16 with 40 tons. If that works well it will be with a properly designed and constructed punch/die.
 
I clicked on the first pic....mild steel shear blade with apparently no cutting edge relief....it's not a shear it's a masher. TIG hardfacing to the edge then grind sharp?
Never heard of hardfacing before and will give it a go. I appreciate the tip.

So I should increase the clearance between the punch and the die?
 

Attachments

  • Screen Shot 2023-12-04 at 12.30.35 PM.png
    Screen Shot 2023-12-04 at 12.30.35 PM.png
    120.5 KB · Views: 6
It won't harden! You could 'case' harden it or apply a hard-facing weld but those won't hold up either. You don't need tool steel for the base or frame, just for the cradle and blade.

D2 is great material, but it isn't forgiving with regard to heat-treat. I send that out to pro shops. If you are not an experienced operator with special equipment, I dare say you'll be disappointed with the result of home-grown hardening of D2.

I also suspect you'll have problems shearing 2 1/2 @ 3/16 with 40 tons. If that works well it will be with a properly designed and constructed punch/die.
Ah, that's a great idea. I'll look into buying tool steel for just the cradle and blade.

Don't want to risk wasting time by hard-facing, so I'll just buy the tool steel!

I really appreciate the tip.
 
The bantam can do 2x2 x 3/16- spec is 10 ton. It has more ton than that I suspect. Great little ironworker.
Appreciate the specs. Ok, now that I know it's not a power issue, I'll build a better tool. I'm having a bit of a hard time figuring out what clearance I should use between the punch and die. If anyone has a rough idea, it would be very helpful.
 

Attachments

  • Screen Shot 2023-12-04 at 12.30.35 PM.png
    Screen Shot 2023-12-04 at 12.30.35 PM.png
    120.5 KB · Views: 0
Never heard of hardfacing before and will give it a go. I appreciate the tip.

So I should increase the clearance between the punch and the die?
Hard facing ain’t gonna work long. Clearance reduces tonnage, increases side load. A 10 ton unit has a 2” thick plate for the frame. Side load is extreme, think a very narrow wedge being driven be all the force.
Larger shears move to double cutters to remove this.
 








 
Back
Top