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Versions of Deckel FP2 with 500mm X travel?

Cycles

Plastic
Joined
May 21, 2020
Hello everyone,

So I might want to update my current Deckel FP1 to an FP2 if there is a good catch in my area. One thing I noticed in the past with offerings for Deckel FP2's that there seems to be a rare version with 500mm travel in X instead of the usual 400mm.

Does anyone know more about these machines? Was this only sold on special order or were there versions or model years were all FP2's were equipped with the 500mm X travel? Is there a way to tell just by serial number or any other characteristic of this machine? Some offerings don't tell any information of the machine or lack good pictures and I would like to determine this beforehand before reaching out or traveling a long distance...

For example FPS sells an older (but refurbished) version of an FP2 with 500mm X-travel: Deckel FP2 mit sonderverfahrweg-x-500mm When you have a look at the speeds and feed selectors, this seems to be one of the earliest versions of the FP2.
 
All the early FP2 were 500mm x travel
The ones with the 2 handwheels withgrip for setting speeds and feeds
It turned out this design did wear the X axe too much so it started to rock over time So in the 60ies I believe they came out with a FP2 with 40pmm travel and simultaniously with the FP3 with 500mm travel Also the previous,FP3 was renamed FP33

Peter
 
For example FPS sells an older (but refurbished) version of an FP2 with 500mm X-travel: Deckel FP2 mit
Looks like an amazing job. The DRO is the type I'm interested in, with a clean console and mounting. Surely far from cheap, too bad the seller belongs to the price on request thinking school.
 
My FP2 is from 1964 and still has 500mm X travel. I think that the FP3 came out in 1966 or 1967, and that's (as Peter wrote) when the FP2 was reduced to 400mm X travel.
 
Like Bruce, my FP2 hales from 64', W/500mm "X" travels.
That FP2 from FPS is a bit of a hybrid.
Late series "Push to turn" hand wheels (which i personally hate), and a late style "low" DRO mount,along with the modern DRO and control setup.
Nice looking machine, Not a big fan of the FPS signature white paint scheme.
 
All the early FP2 were 500mm x travel
The ones with the 2 handwheels withgrip for setting speeds and feeds
It turned out this design did wear the X axe too much so it started to rock over time So in the 60ies I believe they came out with a FP2 with 40pmm travel and simultaniously with the FP3 with 500mm travel Also the previous,FP3 was renamed FP33

Peter
Hey there,

a small correction to Peter, you missed the very early 400 mm double dial one.

So:

- in the beginning FP2 was like this, double dials for speeds/feeds and on/off switches between these dials, with 400 mm X travel:
full


- then, switches moved above the speed dial and X travel was increased to 500 mm:
full

(that's my very first FP2)

- from then on, single dials for speeds/feeds (or no feed dials for the later models) but X back at 400 mm and stayed that way:
full



Like Bruce, my FP2 hales from 64', W/500mm "X" travels.
That FP2 from FPS is a bit of a hybrid.
Late series "Push to turn" hand wheels (which i personally hate), and a late style "low" DRO mount,along with the modern DRO and control setup.
Nice looking machine, Not a big fan of the FPS signature white paint scheme.
+10 on the push to turn hand wheels, and on the white painted machine tools....


On a personal note, as a hobby homeshopper that went through an FP1 (copy), two FP2s and now has a late roundhead FP3, I do believe that the 500 mm FP2 with the long reach is THE most powerfull mill for the home shop (and not only).
If not rebuilt it might not be for suited for space applications, but rarely the homeshop goes that far (and with a couple of tricks it will pull through even for demanding applications).
If you keep it within the 400 mm of travel it'll have (almost) as much rocking as a 400 mm model with similar wear (I said almost...) but the 500 mm really shine for that odd application.
The long reach has two advantages, well the long reach it self, plus being 60 mm higher than the horizontal spindle centerline, which makes it almost 90 mm higher than the regular vertical head. So you end up with a CRAZY table-to-spindle distance, and you can always drop the table as well.
Enclosed motor might have disadvantages for ultimate precision, but nothing the home shopper will ever notice (imho).
Anyhow, stopping here, get an FP2 I say, it's absolutely lovely.

BR,
Thanos
 
Nice looking machine, Not a big fan of the FPS signature white paint scheme.
I have looked again at the pictures on a better screen and I'm even more impressed. Just the outstanding photoset quality of the presentation is the right introduction for talking to a demanding connoisseur.
Without entering the "Deckel as basement queen" discussion territory, I perfectly understand the form and function discourse that FPS is making, at the sound cost of many weeks of preparation and work.
In my opinion, the sleek paint scheme and bold labels are perfect to match both the new "identity" of the machine and the one of its potential buyers.
Incidentally, my own approach to machine restoration is a very different one, I don’t even own a Deckel or particularly want to to get one, but there is only to learn from looking at this level of work.
Rather, a visit to the FPS facility, now that I would enjoy a lot,
 
The shop Romi M17 was painted white with grey.
The white was a bitch to keep looking fresh even in a relatively easy shop environment.
Was not finished smooth but rather powder coated in what i believe is called a "river " finish , sort of a pebbly texture.
My FP4NC on the other hand was Green and also finished with slightly smoother finish and it was lots easier to keep looking clean.
Makers like "Romi" don't finish smooth i think because they would need to spend more time getting the base castings smooth to start. The bebbly finish hides lots of small defects..
Cheers Ross
 
The shop Romi M17 was painted white with grey.
The white was a bitch to keep looking fresh even in a relatively easy shop environment.
Was not finished smooth but rather powder coated in what i believe is called a "river " finish , sort of a pebbly texture.
My FP4NC on the other hand was Green and also finished with slightly smoother finish and it was lots easier to keep looking clean.
Makers like "Romi" don't finish smooth i think because they would need to spend more time getting the base castings smooth to start. The bebbly finish hides lots of small defects..
Cheers Ross
I agree (for once :stirthepot:) Missing any texture makes it so easy to clean
Even white with a smooth finish cleans easy
But I agree White shines in the showroom

Peter
 
I have the a test paper of my 500mm X travel FP2.
The test paper show it was done in december 1966 before delivery to Ford in Cologne (Köln).
And I have seen 400mm single dial FP2s claimed to be from from 1967.
So the model change must be early 1967.
Cheers
Erik
 
I have the a test paper of my 500mm X travel FP2.
The test paper show it was done in december 1966 before delivery to Ford in Cologne (Köln).
And I have seen 400mm single dial FP2s claimed to be from from 1967.
So the model change must be early 1967.
Cheers
Erik
Hey Erik,
Could you please share the test paper?
I'd really like to know what (and how) a new fp2 was supposed to measure! (Sloppy English, but you understand....)

Thanks,
Thanos
 








 
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