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Very close to buying my first printer

Seems like Bob abandoned his own thread but I figure I'd chime in. Depending on what your doing should definitely be the biggest factor in what printer to buy. If you are doing RnD with a printer I recommend bambu. It prints insanely fast so you can iterate designs quickly. Even then, once you have what you like you can tune it in and produce quantity fast.

If print time isn't as important but quality is, Prusa seems to be the way to go. Little workhorses, I only ever hear good things about them.

If you just want to print things every once in a while and can deal with headaches than any old ender clone should suffice.
 
If the build plate is crooked it will do this as it scans to check you have the correct plate in ie cool plate not engineered plate for PLA . The starting off the plate thing seems to be related to nozzle flow and I got around it by just having it zero before each plate . Add's a minute but worth it as I am scheduling a few plates each cycle so and just swapping plates in and pressing continue so to speak.
One issue I hit today which I am blaming on bad fiiliment is a clogged nozzle, I just swapped in a new one and will clean the old one when I get a chance but the instructions on how to clean it by heating an allen key witha blow torch and sticking it in seem a bit rough.

Something I did find funny is that you can get Chinese copies of the Chinese parts cheaper and with better options lol. Take nozzles you can buy hotends with removable nozzles which you cant with Bambu , good to see the Chinese will happily copy chines as well lol ..

1683321998502.png
 
If the build plate is crooked it will do this as it scans to check you have the correct plate in ie cool plate not engineered plate for PLA . The starting off the plate thing seems to be related to nozzle flow and I got around it by just having it zero before each plate . Add's a minute but worth it as I am scheduling a few plates each cycle so and just swapping plates in and pressing continue so to speak.
One issue I hit today which I am blaming on bad fiiliment is a clogged nozzle, I just swapped in a new one and will clean the old one when I get a chance but the instructions on how to clean it by heating an allen key witha blow torch and sticking it in seem a bit rough.

Something I did find funny is that you can get Chinese copies of the Chinese parts cheaper and with better options lol. Take nozzles you can buy hotends with removable nozzles which you cant with Bambu , good to see the Chinese will happily copy chines as well lol ..
I think the problem is that it is somewhat easy to install the build plate incorrectly.

Going back to the OP, it does look like QiDi has a line of new printers using similar high speed tech as the Bambu. Checking out a few quick reviews, it isn't as refined as the Bambu, but does have some unique features. It has a filament cutter, so likely an AMS is coming.


The large 325mm cubed printer for $1100 would be nice for some parts though. I've been printing a lot of drawer inserts and running 4 pieces to fill 24"x24" space would be much nicer than 9. These are some inserts I just did. The bins are Schaller, the printed parts are the lower trays that interlock with each other and are double stick taped in the corners.
IMG_0400.jpg
 
I found this 3D printer selector:


Based on the parameters and features I want (large build size, dual extruder, enclosure) it's recommending the Qidi i-Fast.
 
I avoided the 3d printer thing for years due to the appearance of way too much fiddling around. I just don't have that kind of time anymore. Started watching the Bambu a while back and finally bought one. It's been a week of churning out tools and gadgets for the machine itself.
The only issues I have had are operator error and even then the software kept me out of trouble. CNC mfgs would do well to study what they have done here. It gives me a notice on the phone that it paused with a problem and then proceeds to tell me in plain english what the problem is and how to fix it. I found that part amazing.
It's actually been fun so far. I spent 2k for the machine and some supplies to get going.
I can see already from what I have learned so far a larger version is in my future. Maybe Bambu will answer that call in the near future.
Between their own support forum and many on Fakebook it only takes a few minutes to learn/fix something.
Anyway, 2 thumbs up on the bambu for anyone that want's to do 3d but were concerned about the learning curve. It's simple now.
 
I went from Prusa to Bambu and the Bambu's have been awesome. Have a bank of 5 running straight out of the box for several months with zero issues . The detection features and software is nice and the AMS allows 4 rolls to be fitted and kept dry. Multiplate is awesome so you can schedule days in advance . I will be buying more as demand increases.

Which model of Bambu are you using?

I am very much a hands on, visual person when it comes to designing and making stuff. 3d Cad has been great for that, but sometimes I still need to see things in real life to decide if its what I want. I want a 3d printer, and have been looking for sometime, but I don't want a steep learning curve to get things working.

Bambu's have me intrigued.
 
I avoided the 3d printer thing for years due to the appearance of way too much fiddling around. I just don't have that kind of time anymore. Started watching the Bambu a while back and finally bought one. It's been a week of churning out tools and gadgets for the machine itself.
The only issues I have had are operator error and even then the software kept me out of trouble. CNC mfgs would do well to study what they have done here. It gives me a notice on the phone that it paused with a problem and then proceeds to tell me in plain english what the problem is and how to fix it. I found that part amazing.
It's actually been fun so far. I spent 2k for the machine and some supplies to get going.
I can see already from what I have learned so far a larger version is in my future. Maybe Bambu will answer that call in the near future.
Between their own support forum and many on Fakebook it only takes a few minutes to learn/fix something.
Anyway, 2 thumbs up on the bambu for anyone that want's to do 3d but were concerned about the learning curve. It's simple now.


Good to know. Thanks for sharing.
 
I just got a Bambu X1-C Combo. It had a little learning curve, and it operates primarily through the "cloud" (though there are workarounds), which hadn't been made apparent before purchase. Biggest hiccup was that it comes with a .4mm nozzle, the software defaults to settings for a .2mm nozzle, and despite all it's smarts it doesn't know which nozzle is on the machine, nor is it clearly labeled. After working that out, I'm making two parts in an hour and 45 minutes, compared to my old one (Cel Robox) making one in four hours. Better quality too.
 
I just got a Bambu X1-C Combo. It had a little learning curve, and it operates primarily through the "cloud" (though there are workarounds), which hadn't been made apparent before purchase. Biggest hiccup was that it comes with a .4mm nozzle, the software defaults to settings for a .2mm nozzle, and despite all it's smarts it doesn't know which nozzle is on the machine, nor is it clearly labeled. After working that out, I'm making two parts in an hour and 45 minutes, compared to my old one (Cel Robox) making one in four hours. Better quality too.

I was wondering about the whole “cloud” thing,

My tinfoil hat keeps me from wanting to load stuff on to or have anything tied to the cloud to make work.

Are the work arounds a pain in the butt to use?
 
I was wondering about the whole “cloud” thing,

My tinfoil hat keeps me from wanting to load stuff on to or have anything tied to the cloud to make work.

Are the work arounds a pain in the butt to use?
Apparently you can use a micro-SD card to transfer programs, which means getting a reader/writer for the computer. It would have been nice if it just had a USB cable like everything else.
 
I've been using a Bambu X1C for a couple of months now and its a great printer. The cloud is super easy if you don't mind that, but you should be able to slice it and put it on a SD card like every other printer out there. AMS has been working well for me, and the changing out when filament is empty to the next roll of identical material is great.

I have modified Creality printers, Prusa, built a Voron, and I quite enjoy the Bambu.

Is it the end all of printers? Of course not, but it is a well done printer with minimal fuss at a good price point.
 
Two more things; it gives you a nag screen every time you start a print with filament other than on a Bambu chipped spool, and they made the four-spool feeder / dry box just a little too small to fully close while holding standard spools. Lots of dark patterns to steer you into using their ecosystem.
 
Maybe you need to print one of these for your AMS to allow larger spools?
https://www.printables.com/model/392134-hydra-ams-enhanced-bambu-lab-ams

I really with the AMS was an actual dryer and not juts a dry-ish box but I suppose keeping it hot might upset the helpful elves inside it who handle my filament swaps...
Might just buy one:

On second thought, that's just the base parts and some screws; I'd still have to take apart the original and rebuild it with the new parts. Sounds like a bit of a pain.
 
Maybe not a popular opinion but I'm totally fine buying into their ecosystem (guess I'm just a sheep?) and using their filaments/slicer/etc... After years of printing with a myriad of $150 ender to $2000 Qidi printers and the tweaking and tuning involved its nice to have one that (mostly) works straight out of the box.
I have too many other things to do to spend time doing something as inane as testing slicer settings for this or that brand filament to save a few bucks a roll. I just checked Amazon bootleg brand ($60) vs Bambu ($90) for 1kg carbon nylon, even most of the off-brands are in the $90-100 ballpark so the price seems appropriate.

Like a lot of people I use my printers for testing fit/form and making quick iterations of a design, that idea goes out the window when I have to babysit the machine. Some people get a kick out of dialing things in like that and enjoy the journey portion of it, but these machines are a means to an end for my purposes.
 
Maybe not a popular opinion but I'm totally fine buying into their ecosystem (guess I'm just a sheep?) and using their filaments/slicer/etc... After years of printing with a myriad of $150 ender to $2000 Qidi printers and the tweaking and tuning involved its nice to have one that (mostly) works straight out of the box.
I have too many other things to do to spend time doing something as inane as testing slicer settings for this or that brand filament to save a few bucks a roll. I just checked Amazon bootleg brand ($60) vs Bambu ($90) for 1kg carbon nylon, even most of the off-brands are in the $90-100 ballpark so the price seems appropriate.

Like a lot of people I use my printers for testing fit/form and making quick iterations of a design, that idea goes out the window when I have to babysit the machine. Some people get a kick out of dialing things in like that and enjoy the journey portion of it, but these machines are a means to an end for my purposes.

That is exactly why I haven't bought one yet. I already have plenty of things I am working on or learning, I need something that more or less just works, so I can get back to everything else I need to do.
 
Maybe not a popular opinion but I'm totally fine buying into their ecosystem (guess I'm just a sheep?) and using their filaments/slicer/etc... After years of printing with a myriad of $150 ender to $2000 Qidi printers and the tweaking and tuning involved its nice to have one that (mostly) works straight out of the box.
I have too many other things to do to spend time doing something as inane as testing slicer settings for this or that brand filament to save a few bucks a roll. I just checked Amazon bootleg brand ($60) vs Bambu ($90) for 1kg carbon nylon, even most of the off-brands are in the $90-100 ballpark so the price seems appropriate.

Like a lot of people I use my printers for testing fit/form and making quick iterations of a design, that idea goes out the window when I have to babysit the machine. Some people get a kick out of dialing things in like that and enjoy the journey portion of it, but these machines are a means to an end for my purposes.
No testing needed in my experience. I'm running Paramount ABS, using Bambu's "Generic ABS" settings, and it's perfect.
 
I think I'm going to disable the AI image recognition failure detection on the Bambu. I've gotten a false positive, a couple false negatives, and zero accurate activations.
 








 
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