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Very late to the CNC party.

You are ABSOLUTELY not too old to learn CNC. I'm older than you and I did so quite successfully. You have the added advantage of a lot more manual machining experience than I had as well.
On suggestion to make things go faster would be to locate a trade school or community college nearby and take all the CNC related classes, especially hand-coding g-code, and learning your preferred CAD/CAM software. Learning this in the classroom environment will accelerate the process of getting you up to speed.
YOU ABSOLUTELY CAN BE SUCCESFUL at this transition, and you'll quickly realize how much you were missing out having not previously been in the CNC world.
 
@Springer Can you give rough dollar figures? As in- $80k for four Haas mills, $15k for X lathe, $100k for business that does $250k gross and XX net profit?

Not exact numbers, but a frame of reference. It may be a very good deal or awful.
 
Not exact numbers, but a frame of reference. It may be a very good deal or awful.
That's a good suggestion, except his location says UK. I don't know if their market conditions, repairs, spares, everything else will be skewed to ours. My guess from past reading here is that Haas service isn't like stateside. Maybe add UK: to the front of the thread title to attract someone? Paging @gregormarwick to the Haas courtesy phone...
 
Thank you so much everyone for the replies, the encouragement and realism is valuable to me.

Just to add further to my initial post.

The business was being intentionally wound down after being successful for 20yrs with a mixture of good demand for some of its products and less for others., the owner seems comfortable and I dont think there were many opportunities to sell the business as a whole.

Im not paying for goodwill just a small amount for the IP, the machines vary in price with the most expensive 4 axis machine being around $15k and others in the $8k-$10k range. My investment in the machinery and relocation and re-comissioning would be about $60k, this is something I can afford quite easily and I figure if in 1-2yrs if Im not making money I could sell up and not loose a whole lot. Indeed Im based in the UK but have quoted dollar figures as you guys seem to be mainly in the US.

The friend who offered to help would certainly not be wanting to work significant hours, he is enjoying his retirement but his experience would be at a senior technician level so he understands the machinery and how to operate it. Exactly how much help and how much I could rely on him remains to be seen.

This isnt a make or break high risk thing for me, I have done ok in life and my future is secure without the need for this business to succeed but Im also a driven guy who thinks he has another 12yrs or so of work left in him and wonders if he could make a go of it, its genuinely my first real opportunity to get into CNC. Im quite quick at picking up programmes, I taught myself Fusion 360 from a design aspect quite quickly and Youtube or Facebook groups seem to have most answers if your stuck.

A local CNC repair man said old HAAS machines were fairly well catered for but I expect these machines will undoubtedly be a bigger risk that nearly new stuff. 6 series aluminium and 4 series stainless have been the materials used but mainly aluminium.

If I lost the whole $60k I would be sore but not bereft by any means. Im also not needing to make $400k a year. If I could make $50-60k a year from them and work an honest 40hrs I would be happy. I have good sales and marketing skills that have served me well in my own business and the parts I would be making are in a field I understand from a sales and marketing perspective.

If Im honest my biggest worry is my ability or inability to get these machines making chips effectively without it taking me 2yrs to do so. If I can design in Fusion I need to learn to transfer this to CAM and then G Code. Thanks again everybody for your thoughts.
 
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The tone of that message and your previous one are completely different. The prices seem absolutely reasonable for a guy wanting to sell them to you. Sellers often want more than that but, that's a price that's tough to beat.

The biggest thing after that would be the new location: does it involve rent or other ongoing expenses? Will you have business insurance? Product liability insurance? Local taxes on businesses, licensing, etc? No need to post the answers but, things to think about. I'm kinda' surprised how many businesses fly without any insurance but, it's apparently a thing.
 
I just put together that this dude had been earning a living with manual machines making gun stuff in England. That's like doing A/C repair at the South Pole. @Springer, you got this.

Expect a couple wires to be bounced loose when the machines get moved, just have to beat your head against the control long enough and they'll start working again. I do it every time we buy a used machine...
 
Definitely a more realistic second chapter on this than the first post but one thing .... not a chance in hell I'd go with fusion. Masterscam, old Surfcam, even Bobcad, but take any autodesk stuff and flush it down the toilet. Eventually you will be really really sorry you wasted any time, effort or money on anything from that company. They have never done anything that didn't turn out to be a giant gangbang of the customer in the end.
 
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That's a good suggestion, except his location says UK. I don't know if their market conditions, repairs, spares, everything else will be skewed to ours. My guess from past reading here is that Haas service isn't like stateside. Maybe add UK: to the front of the thread title to attract someone? Paging @gregormarwick to the Haas courtesy phone...

I honestly don't know, nor do I know who might. The few shops I know personally that did have Haas machines don't have them anymore, and I don't know of any UK forum members who own Haas machines either.

They appear to have three or four locations in the UK, and according to their UK website claim to have 30 service engineers in the country. That is more than most, or maybe even all, other MTB's over here, so I am highly sceptical of that number... Either it's a blatant lie, or they are counting third party engineers, or perhaps it says something about the reliability of Haas...

They seem overrepresented compared to their market share, which may just be marketing. One of their UK sites is their F1 headquarters and might have nothing whatsoever to do with their core business.

Pretty much all other MTB's in the UK have one location and at most half that many service techs. There are some independent machine suppliers who cover a range of MTBs who might have as many service personnel as Haas are claiming to.

In summary, I have no idea.
 








 
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