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Wade 8a #407

Looks great Darren! VFDs are magical devices. A big part of that is learning the programming and using all the various remote switching options.
Some models have remote control pads available, which helps to unclutter the machine. I mounted my most recent VFD inside a rear compartment of my Logan lathe. Teco doesn't offer that for the Teco, and if they did it would not look Vintage. I like your solution a lot.
Thanks Rex!! They are and I agree, the remote would be great, but..... in this case, I do want the fashion AND function. :)

Looks great!
A foot or two of Greenfield would work to protect the wiring. Probably no need for Sealtight conduit. VFD would be happier and have a longer life if installed in an enclosure.
Enclosure is on the list. I've various solutions that look period correct. Here's one example. Image courtesy of Vintage Machinery.org.

However, I'm wanting something a bit more stylish... This is about the only image I can find of a Wade 8a with oak cabinet and a cover on the left side. This cover includes some louvers and has a nice period correct/art deco feel that I would LOVE to replicate.... I wish I could find a better image.
 
A bit of an update.
Every Wade 8a I've seen has had issues with the gear select on the upper left of the head stock. After ensuring flatness, smooth operation of all parts, spring adjustment, and tearing down the gears 20+ times, I realized something. The issue isn't how I assembled the selector, the gear fitment, or anything else I could control. The issue is simply a weak point in the design.
Here was my logic and solution.
As one pulls to the left, with their left hand, to disengage the spring loaded selector pin, they are also pulling the assembly to the left. Thus putting the entire gear assembly in a bind. This results in all manner of work arounds but all end up putting even more bind on the assembly.
So how did I fix it?
I milled a slot into the cast iron assembly plate in a small arc, drilled and tapped a small hole in the head stock and then used a die filler to fine tune the slot. The result? The cap head bolt is tightened to and slip fit and slides on the slot shoulder and keeps the entire assembly from binding. Works like a charm and is MUCH easier to select gears. Another unexpected, side effect is that this also removed some of the harmonics from the gears and the whole lathe is noticeably quieter.

Milling the slot




Hole drilled and tapped


Die filing the slot




Gear assembly "plate" installed with cap head bolt.

Hard to see, sorry, but .. gears installed




 
Also, I received a gift a few months ago in the form of an original Wade 8a collet rack. Thank you Greg Menke!!
I cleaned it up a bit, mounted it to the inside of the door and started adding collets. Why Wade only made 28 holes is beyond me. 1 more column and I could have at least added the 32's. Oh well. Good thing I also play with 3d printers. :) The 3d printed collet rack will ultimately be mounted on the back side of the Wade on/near a chip shield that I have yet to fabricate. The projects are never ending. :)



 
A bit of an update.
Every Wade 8a I've seen has had issues with the gear select on the upper left of the head stock. After ensuring flatness, smooth operation of all parts, spring adjustment, and tearing down the gears 20+ times, I realized something. The issue isn't how I assembled the selector, the gear fitment, or anything else I could control. The issue is simply a weak point in the design.
Here was my logic and solution.
As one pulls to the left, with their left hand, to disengage the spring loaded selector pin, they are also pulling the assembly to the left. Thus putting the entire gear assembly in a bind. This results in all manner of work arounds but all end up putting even more bind on the assembly.
So how did I fix it?
I milled a slot into the cast iron assembly plate in a small arc, drilled and tapped a small hole in the head stock and then used a die filler to fine tune the slot. The result? The cap head bolt is tightened to and slip fit and slides on the slot shoulder and keeps the entire assembly from binding. Works like a charm and is MUCH easier to select gears. Another unexpected, side effect is that this also removed some of the harmonics from the gears and the whole lathe is noticeably quieter.

Milling the slot




Hole drilled and tapped


Die filing the slot




Gear assembly "plate" installed with cap head bolt.

Hard to see, sorry, but .. gears installed




Nice work, no OEM built a perfect machine. There is point where engineering stops and production starts.
 








 
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