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Walker Turner 20" Drill Press Rehabilitation Journey

I've been away from this project for a few days but I did manage to get the motor disassembled.

Motor Disassembled.jpg

I'm on the fence about whether to sand blast or give electrolysis a try. Either way I'll pressure wash the end bells and washn the other parts - less the stator, rotor of course.
Rick
 
I usually just sandblast whatever needs it after masking the $#it out of the windings [if exposed], followed by a quick hot water pressure wash [excluding the windings] after, if I am worried about grit in oil passages or sleeve bearings.
 
What I typically do with motors is sand blast. With end bells I plug/double layer duct tape the bearing seats and plug oil/grease passages. For the stator - I don't sand blast. I protect the windings with cardboard strips and duct tape ad then use a 4" knotted wire wheel on the exterior of the casing and a dremel on the step where the end bells join it. I'll post a pic of the stator method I use

Rick
 
A couple of pictures of how I protect the stator while wire wheeling the case. Thin strips of cardboard through the air vent openings crossing over the end of the stator. Repeated on opposite end. I have already wire wheeled the case and just need to drill one more drive pin hole for a tag. I screwed up when removing the "equipped with ball bearings" tag and need to move it a bit.

Rick

Stator Protection 1.jpgStator Protection 2.jpg
 
While I've got your attention - I'm looking for opinions on color. I'm going to paint the machine a greenish gray that I have used for WT machines quite a few times. I would normally use black as an accent color for stator casing, safety rings, etc. I was thinking this time of using something different - so what do you think of the options in the picture below, I have my favorite (I think) but won't say so I don't bias you.Highlight Color.jpg

Thanks
Rick
 
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The most talented on here rebuild machines without refinishing, a few of us like to go the extra mile and rebuild/restore, which means factory colors [or close] but there is not many that customize vintage machines. Perhaps, that is why you are not getting much response. I'll bet if you included the factory [black, I presume] color chip, you would get more replies.
 
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That's a reasonable point of view and one I typically would try nd follow. In this case I wanted to try and get to the next level. In the picture you can see a handle that depicts the black I usually use. I gave up years ago in trying to match OEM paint - I found it was never consistent over the years and examples I had were generally well worn nd not representative of factory condition. The gray/green body pint in the picture was a very close match to a WT 20" I had years ago. I have also seen (and actually have a WT bench top) that is a much lighter greenish color.

Rick
 
I for one enjoy seeing a machine in a non stock color or shade the original builder could/should have used, especially if the tool was squirted with that ever popular barf green or puss white.:vomit:
 
I decided to go with basic black as an accent color

Took some parts off to sandblasting yesterday - I decided even though expensive it will be quicker and better job than I would do.

Parts Off  to Sandblast.jpg

The new badges arrived yesterday - not cheap but what an improvement

New Badges.jpg

Started to clean up motor parts and got bearings ordered.

Rick
 
You need to get set up with enough air to do blasting in house. That way your abrasive is the biggest expense.
 
You need to get set up with enough air to do blasting in house. That way your abrasive is the biggest expense.
I agree - just can't convince myself yet that the extra air is worth it. I'm getting to the point age wise where this whole rebuild/restore thing is going to slow down. :)

While in waiting mode for motor parts (end bells at sand blast, bearings, paint drying on stator casing) I decided to quit dancing around what I thought was going to be the hardest job of the project - getting the column out of the base. My strategy was to lay the base down on the ground and support the column so it was more or less straight out from the base.

Column Disassembly base End.jpg

Column Disassembly Top End.jpg

I found two set screws on the outside of the base and an additional two on the underside of the base. After removing them and making sure there were no ,more I squirted it with some PB Blaster and used a wooden plug in the underside of the column as a hammering point. I started with a standard hammer and gently rapped the plug - nothing - hit it a little harder and got some movement - YAHOO! Got out my 3# small sledge and used it - got movement on every hit. Stopped frequently to spray some more blaster. After about 30 minutes the column was out.

Column Disassembly Extraction Plug.jpg

The wooden plug was really wedged in - I ended up splitting it to get it out. So now I need to power wash the base and get it ready for sand blasting and clean up the column. I would typically use a pvc pipe and evaporust but that is going to take 6 to 7 gallons of evaporust - pretty expensive at $25 to $30 a gallon so I'm going to rethink that.

I also would normally put the column in my PM 90 for final work - this column is 66" long, 3-3/4" OD and 3/8" wall. The calculated weight is 75# - do you think that is to much for a PM 90 to support and spin?

Rick
 
My set up for cleaning up the column on a PM 90 lathe

Column on Lathe Overall.jpgColumn on Lathe Chuck.jpgColumn on Lathe Steady Rest.jpg

Seems to be working OK - the lathe is not complaining but I'm running it at very slow speed
Rick
 
So I did the highly unrecommended process when cleaning up the column - quick pass with a knotted wire wheel, followed by 80 to 1000 grit with - dare I say - sand paper and then some paste wax. before and after

Column Disassembly Top End.jpgColumn Finished.jpg


Still lots of scars and some staining but its the best I could do without even more extreme methods.

Rick
 
Another potential [problem. While cleaning up the base I noticed a crack on the underside through one 0f the ribs. See the lower left quadrant behind the column hole

Base Crack 1.jpg

It propagates to the bottom of the rib and goes through the rib.

Base Crack 2.jpg

Base Crack 3.jpg

My gut says leave it alone - it doesn't appear to be new. Any thoughts?

Thanks
Rick
 








 
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