What's new
What's new

Welding to a Coil Spring?

RonRock

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 18, 2012
Location
Underwood, IA
I posted this on The Garage Journal, so sorry if this seems out of line. But I was told basically not to do it. No surprise there, but I am in a position where I have no choice but to at least try it. Hopefully it will work for what I need. If not I'm out nothing but time. And a little learning along the way.

From my GJ post,

"I am finally getting around to making a stand for my Paint Shaker. Heavy Red Devil. I have a stand that is a post with a steel plate top and bottom. Plan on using concrete anchors in the bottom to the slab and having the machine setting on springs then the top plate.

So my plan is to weld bolts to flat washers then weld the washers to the springs. One top and one bottom. then bolt the springs to the plate and shaker. Pretty straight forward. I'm using valve springs that seem appropriate. Won't know until things are set up to try. No big deal if the springs aren't correct it will at least give me a starting point.
Enough BS. Here's the question. I will TIG the washers to the springs. I'm not sure what to expect from the springs after I weld on them. Will they likely just break at the end of the weld affected zone? Should I drop them in oil after welding? Water? Cool naturally? Thoughts?"

So my reason for asking here.

Is there anything I can do that may help with the welding to the spring? I have a heat treat oven. Not sure if that helps, but maybe. What about quenching? Air cool? So many variables I just have no idea. Just trying to give this the best chance of success I can. If it fails no surprise there.
 
I gas welded valve springs to really thick washers. The springs were submerged in water so only a small section protruded. It was a tie bar to the top of a motor and I never experienced any cracking. I didn't quench after welding just let them sit in the water. Your mileage may differ.
 
I have a Red Devil shaker and it just sits on top of the springs as there is a pocket in the base for each spring. It is so heavy there is no need to actually attach it to the springs and I am fairly certain it was like that from the factory. It gently bounces on the springs and works very well.
Mine is a single can shaker.
 
I gas welded valve springs to really thick washers. The springs were submerged in water so only a small section protruded. It was a tie bar to the top of a motor and I never experienced any cracking. I didn't quench after welding just let them sit in the water. Your mileage may differ.
Thank you, that is something. Seems like a good way to keep most of the spring protected from excessive heat. And not the shock from quenching.
 
I have a Red Devil shaker and it just sits on top of the springs as there is a pocket in the base for each spring. It is so heavy there is no need to actually attach it to the springs and I am fairly certain it was like that from the factory. It gently bounces on the springs and works very well.
Mine is a single can shaker.

That would certainly make things much easier. The pictures of the ones I've seen show a base of some bent strap that is supported on the outside of the shaker by a spring. Similar to what I'm doing, just has a wider footprint.

This is my second Red Devil shaker. My first was 30 years ago. At that time I was painting cars so had a real need for it. I made a pedestal like this one, bolted the shaker to the pedestal, then pedestal to shop floor. That thing shook like hell. Never failed, but it really shook. So hopefully I can do better this time around.
 
Last edited:
I have one of those paint shakers. It just sits on the springs. I've been using it that way for 25 years.
 
I've got some stick rod here from Lawson Products that would more than likely work. We've never had it fail and one of their demonstrations was welding springs with it. We affectionately call it "miracle rod" and use it sparingly since it comes from Lawson =$$$.
I would think if you went to any welding shop (people who weld, not sell stuff) they would sell you a stick of something they've come across similar to the Lawson rod.

But there have already been some good suggestions and it's ALWAYS better to have a weldless design if possible.
 
I posted this on The Garage Journal, so sorry if this seems out of line. But I was told basically not to do it. No surprise there, but I am in a position where I have no choice but to at least try it. Hopefully it will work for what I need. If not I'm out nothing but time. And a little learning along the way.

From my GJ post,

"I am finally getting around to making a stand for my Paint Shaker. Heavy Red Devil. I have a stand that is a post with a steel plate top and bottom. Plan on using concrete anchors in the bottom to the slab and having the machine setting on springs then the top plate.

So my plan is to weld bolts to flat washers then weld the washers to the springs. One top and one bottom. then bolt the springs to the plate and shaker. Pretty straight forward. I'm using valve springs that seem appropriate. Won't know until things are set up to try. No big deal if the springs aren't correct it will at least give me a starting point.
Enough BS. Here's the question. I will TIG the washers to the springs. I'm not sure what to expect from the springs after I weld on them. Will they likely just break at the end of the weld affected zone? Should I drop them in oil after welding? Water? Cool naturally? Thoughts?"

So my reason for asking here.

Is there anything I can do that may help with the welding to the spring? I have a heat treat oven. Not sure if that helps, but maybe. What about quenching? Air cool? So many variables I just have no idea. Just trying to give this the best chance of success I can. If it fails no surprise there.
welding on it will usually soften or temper the steel around it then there will be a hardened steel zone just outside that where it will crack the welds off.
mechanical fasteners are best without welding for springs.
 
Most every manufacturer makes a magic rod that will weld to most any steel. One common name is Harris SuperMissileWeld. Generally a modified 312 stainless chemistry. Inconel 625 will do similar, at an even more eye watering price.
 
Most every manufacturer makes a magic rod that will weld to most any steel. One common name is Harris SuperMissileWeld. Generally a modified 312 stainless chemistry. Inconel 625 will do similar, at an even more eye watering price.

Interesting what about Silicone Bronze TIG? I have some for another project that never got done. Bandsaw casting that I replaced rather than TIG Braze.
 
While I've never tried tig brazing on high alloy steels, I don't think it would be as successful as torch brazing. If I was to try it, I would try very hard to keep the arc off the alloy steel and on the mild steel. Just let the heat wash warm the alloy steel to brazing temperature.
 
I'm just wondering why you can't encompass the spring with a pipe or put a pipe inside the spring if you need to "attach" it to the spring.
Obviously only like 2 or 3" not the whole spring.
 
A little follow up on this.

I did as suggested and braze to the springs. Placed the springs in a container of water for brazing. The brazing went as expected, but I was disappointed that my washers did not set flat on the springs. Not sure why, the springs were all ground to a flat surface top and bottom. But no problem there is enough flex that they sat in the cups on the shaker and sat on the plate fine after tightening the nuts. So it seemed all is good. Moved into the designated space, bolt to floor and go fora shake.

Well crap! The thing shook so bad I was afraid to be near it. Well not quite that bad, but obviously not good. Not sure why the springs seemed like the right size. But defiantly not. So I pulled them out, replaced with some rubber "pucks" that I had on the shelf for another try. The pucks worked OK. Not perfect, but good enough.

So all in the shaker finally is usable20231203_122249 (Medium).jpg20231203_122158 (Medium).jpg20231203_125704 (Medium).jpg20231203_143612 (Medium).jpg


. I learned a little along the way. Gave the springs a shot. Nothing lost but a little time and some stuff I had laying around.

Thanks for all the advice.
 
Hell, even if you annealed it, or otherwise damaged it, it's only on the end of the spring. The end doesn't do that much work.
 








 
Back
Top