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What is our responsibility to the next generation of manufacturing?

I think the place to draw the line in terms of what to share and teach is: between what is common trade knowledge (or ought to be, hey?) and what specialized processes/procedures, tools and/or methods that are created by one's self. One is tradecraft, one is basically intellectual property. Don't sell yourself short, but don't be a stingy dickhead to someone trying to learn either. As far as customers and purchasing agents, I have never shared tips and tricks. They order the work, they get it delivered, they pay the bill.

If they want me to teach them how to do it my way, with my specialized methods and/or tools, that's called consultancy. That costs a lot more money.
 
How does one make them want to learn it?
Maybe push and challenge? Most certainly there are limits to that.
Most people want to go home feeling very good that they excel at what they do at work even if toady's output was scarp at QC.
Well that's the tough part, innit it? You just can't make someone learn much.

It took me a while to realize while most people want to do their job well, each has his own idea of what that entails. For some just showing up every day is a job well done.

One is a pleasure to help. The other is usually a burden. The best you can hope is one day the light bulb will come on and the learning will begin.

And that is a very good day.
 
The venture capitalists and corporate vultures cancelled the notion of loyalty and fair dealing a lot of years ago ...........the current generation is "all for one ,that one is me"

Guys like this are the problem the OP is talking about, assuming there is anything there worth imparting. The Venture Capitalists? You mean the Boomers. “corporate vultures”? You mean the Boomers. The entire generation with the motto of “Fuck you, I got mine”?

Why shouldn’t the “current generation” take the same adage? Oh right, you probably think Millennials are the latest generation…
 
A bit of a different pespective about institional knowledge - I'm getting to the point where I could consider retirement (I do enginering/maching in a research outfit) and opened up a discussion with management about the chance of mentoring somebody to replace me when the time comes - long story short: no new hires, everyone who I might have selected, those folks have zero bandwith they're so busy. Well I tried at least.
 
Guys like this are the problem the OP is talking about, assuming there is anything there worth imparting. The Venture Capitalists? You mean the Boomers. “corporate vultures”? You mean the Boomers. The entire generation with the motto of “Fuck you, I got mine”?

Why shouldn’t the “current generation” take the same adage? Oh right, you probably think Millennials are the latest generation…
He's busy passing on his knowledge on how to be an intolerant, bigoted grumpy old man freely on this forum all the time.

OT being ex military I pay attention to what veterans have to say regarding the conflicts we have been involved in over the last few decades. Laying aside whether the conflicts were justified on not. Who was prepared to step up to the plate and lay their life on the line fighting for what they believe in. The same people that are being bitched about. God help us if we ever go to war with China but if we do the youngsters that are being vilified will step up as they always do. So get out of your bubble people and develop a little perspective.
 
One of my first mentors told me years ago he enjoys spending time with others in the industry if he can either make money, teach, or learn from them. The key is to not confuse those three things. If you want a friend, save that for after work.
 
Simple fact is nothing I know will be of any value in the near future.......all my attitudes are wrong ,for sure,Im in survival mode now ,just trying to avoid being stabbed or robbed by a teenager with 95 convictions for violence ,housebreaking and car stealing.........and has never spent a day in jail.
 
Laying aside whether the conflicts were justified on not.

Excuse me here for a moment, but how can you "lay aside whether the conflicts were justified" ? You are talking about going off to someone else's country and killing a bunch of people. It's bad enough when a person can actually justify the war, as in WW II, but "going off to sacrifice for what they believe", what if what they believe is that women are third-rate property ? The earth is flat ? there's a foriegner old man in the sky with a gray beard, and your old man has black hair and brown eyes ? go kill ! the domino theory ? whatever the hell they came up with to "justify" afghanistan ?

Being young should not mean you have to be ignorant, stupid, and vicious. I can't see where going off to possibly die but mostly kill other people because some halfwit with an axe to grind in your jingoist government thought it would be cool (except he certainly didn't send his kids ! miraculously, the vietnam war stopped when rich kids started coming home in plastic bags) .... sorry. I can't see this as a virtue.
 
How does one make them want to learn it?
Maybe push and challenge? Most certainly there are limits to that.
Most people want to go home feeling very good that they excel at what they do at work even if toady's output was scarp at QC.
I don't know, ...one of the many reasons I never wanted to be a parent, (and ensured I wasn't)
 
You can't force someone to want to learn. Just like you can't teach someone to be a good worker. You can teach what a good worker is and what they can do to improve themselves. At the end of the day it is each individuals choice whether they want to learn or want to be a good worker. Now I do believe that you can be a good influence on people. I tell my owner all the time when he asks me what I look for in one of my employees. Give me people that have a good work ethic and will be here over people with a ton of knowledge. I can teach knowledge. The other stuff is up the individual.
 
I once heard someone say. With enough bananas I can teach a monkey to do it.
 
Guys like this are the problem the OP is talking about, assuming there is anything there worth imparting. The Venture Capitalists? You mean the Boomers. “corporate vultures”? You mean the Boomers. The entire generation with the motto of “Fuck you, I got mine”?

Why shouldn’t the “current generation” take the same adage? Oh right, you probably think Millennials are the latest generation…

Where have you been for the last 5 years?
Their motto is now "Fuck you, I got mine, and now I'm taking yours too."
 
The main issue I see these days is most people don't want the knowledge, experience or understanding they just want the answer and the rewards.

Sadly the only way to get the answer and the rewards without the knowledge, experience and understanding is to stand on other people who do have it
 
Some youngsters want to get in the last word and so miss much of the instruction. I showed a 12-year-old how to tie a surgeon's knot yesterday, to tie a bunch of 1/4" bamboo poles tightly together. She listened intently so like will retain that knowledge.
How: You make a simple overhand knot but go under 3 or 4 times, then with twisting around 90 or 180* that pulls tight together, you then put a normal overhand on top and the knot is locked.
 
I went to a vocation high school where we operated industrial machines at 14-18 years old.

At my rural Virginia high school back in the early 80's, we took "Agriculture" class starting in the 8th grade: 13 years old.

The class had nothing to do with Ag, it was woodshop and welding, in a building adjacent to the high school. We used industrial table saws, radial arm saws, joiners, planers, band saws, large drill presses, oxy-acetylene torches, Miller stick welders, lacquer spray guns...

For 50 minutes per day 5 days per week, we had fun and learned a lot in "Ag" class.
Sadly, even then it was considered the class and direction for slow boys, or problem boys. There never was a girl in the class, they took "Home Ec" instead, learning how to cook, sew, etc.

I can't see 13 year-olds using all this equipment today...

Ag class at the high school led me to take machine shop at the county vocational school for half-days my junior and senior year. It paid off: I won the state VICA skills contest in machine shop my senior year, and got to compete in the US Skill Olympics in Phoenix in '85.

I did start engineering at Virginia Tech that fall, and even though machine shop class had put me on the path to starting and owning a shop, it made it rough academically at VT the first year or so...since I had missed several of the high school pre-requisite classes by taking making shop. (Partying and womanizing didn't help much either...tehe.)

I've never understand how I got into the VT engineering program without the proper classes...I was actually shocked when the letter came!

I guess they saw potential in the scrappy wannabe engineer/machinist??
 
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The real evidence of a dying art is that no young punks are telling us that their new is better . . .
 
Some youngsters want to get in the last word and so miss much of the instruction. I showed a 12-year-old how to tie a surgeon's knot yesterday, to tie a bunch of 1/4" bamboo poles tightly together. She listened intently so like will retain that knowledge.
How: You make a simple overhand knot but go under 3 or 4 times, then with twisting around 90 or 180* that pulls tight together, you then put a normal overhand on top and the knot is locked.
Great to hear, I mentor several young females and they are keen to learn and aquire new skills. It's about the only thing that gives me hope.
 
At my rural Virginia high school back in the early 80's, we took "Agriculture" class starting in the 8th grade: 13 years old.

The class had nothing to do with Ag, it was woodshop and welding, in a building adjacent to the high school. We used industrial table saws, radial arm saws, joiners, planers, band saws, large drill presses, oxy-acetylene torches, Miller stick welders, lacquer spray guns...

For 50 minutes per day 5 days per week, we had fun and learned a lot in "Ag" class.
Sadly, even then it was considered the class and direction for slow boys, or problem boys. There never was a girl in the class, they took "Home Ec" instead, learning how to cook, sew, etc.

I can't see 13 year-olds using all this equipment today...

Ag class at the high school led me to take machine shop at the county vocational school for half-days my junior and senior year. It paid off: I won the state VICA skills contest in machine shop my senior year, and got to compete in the US Skill Olympics in Phoenix in '85.

I did start engineering at Virginia Tech that fall, and even though machine shop class had put me on the path to starting and owning a shop, it made it rough academically at VT the first year or so...since I had missed several of the high school pre-requisite classes by taking making shop. (Partying and womanizing didn't help much either...tehe.)

I've never understand how I got into the VT engineering program without the proper classes...I was actually shocked when the letter came!

I guess they saw potential in the scrappy wannabe engineer/machinist??
So different from where I live. My local high school, where one of my sons graduated, about ten miles from here (I live in a rural area) still has Ag classes, which include animal biology and raising methods, plant biology and ag studies, along with welding classes, from beginner to advance, and they build things like hay racks and trailers in class every year. Plus they have a cnc lab, where they learn to program and run a cnc router (mistakes in particle board are pretty forgiving).
These same kids can also, as juniors and seniors, take classes in diesel mechanics, welding, and manufacturing tech, carbon fiber boatbuilding, and more, at the local community college, and get both high school and college credit for those at the same time.
They can then go on to better community college and university programs locally in welding, machining, and manufacturing, or even vehicle design, all at state schools nearby.

I have always hired young people and trained em, for close to 40 years now. I cant afford Union Journeymen, but I have never had a problem getting smart young people who want to work with metal, I pay well above minimum wage, and there are plenty of smart motivated kids around here. I usually hire recent grads of 2 year AA programs in manufacturing tech or welding, because they have already spent their own time and money learning the basics, and proving commitment.
We have a pretty thriving high tech manufacturing industry here in the PNW- obviously Boeing, and lots of large subs to Boeing, along with shipbuilding, but lots of small machining and fab work, wind generator towers, and lots more. Carbon fiber is big around here, biggest local employer in my county after the schools, Janicki, does a lot of carbon fiber and they have 100' capacity milling machines for nautical and aerospace stuff. They, like me, hire motivated young people and train em. They pay a lot more though...
I just drove by the local Hexcell factory, where they make composite hex sheets and other wacky things- after 9/11 they made a lot of light weight honeycomb titanium cockpit doors- anyway, they had a sign on the road- "Now Hiring, starting wage $21.40/hr."
My guess is they are having a hard time finding people that cheap, hence the permanent sign outside.
The USA is really about 7 different economies, and some of em are doing better than others I guess.
 
Start them off with safety young. My dad's hearing is destroyed from shooting guns with his dad as a kid. My dad made absolutely certain that I wore hearing protection any time I did something loud, even so much as swinging a hammer. That lesson has stuck with me and hearing protection doesn't bother me at all unlike some people who didn't grow up with it.
 








 
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