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Where can I rent a pickup that allows more than 10000# trailer towing?

Why wouldn't you just use skates???

I skated my 400mm HMC literally 1/4 mile through a 250k sq ft facility. It wasn't a big deal. Took about 20 minutes. On Hilmans.
I don't think skates would work very well on a partially graveled, unlevel, and rolling lane surrounded by parked equipment and construction materials. I am basing that knowledge of the lane on Google Earth images and a side comment by the owner. More details have not been revealed to me. And that is part of my concern.

Denis
 
I don't think skates would work very well on a partially graveled, unlevel, and rolling lane surrounded by parked equipment and construction materials. I am basing that knowledge of the lane on Google Earth images and a side comment by the owner. More details have not been revealed to me. And that is part of my concern.

Denis

Oh! No concrete floor presents fun challenges for all!

Good luck!
 
I don't think skates would work very well on a partially graveled, unlevel, and rolling lane surrounded by parked equipment and construction materials. I am basing that knowledge of the lane on Google Earth images and a side comment by the owner. More details have not been revealed to me. And that is part of my concern.

Denis
Do you have access to two sections of steel plate you can trade off between as decking over the gravel, to leapfrog your way?

"You know, like the Egyptians."
 
I recently did a load out from a bakery closure. Typical large plant. But the hallways were uneven brick and quite steeply V shaped, I'd guess to channel water. My load was minor, and on a dolly. It would have been a terrible surprise for anyone planning to use skates.
 
I recently did a load out from a bakery closure. Typical large plant. But the hallways were uneven brick and quite steeply V shaped, I'd guess to channel water. My load was minor, and on a dolly. It would have been a terrible surprise for anyone planning to use skates.
Yes, it is surprises and consequent unpreparedness that I am trying to avoid.

Denis
 
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Do you have access to two sections of steel plate you can trade off between as decking over the gravel, to leapfrog your way?

"You know, like the Egyptians."
If the ground/lane were graded fairly evenly, dragging the machine over plates might work if I had a means to lift and move them. But, I think the path is anything but graded and smooth and there is no machine known to be capable of lifting the plates on site.. The truck I intend(ed) to hire does have a good winch on the front. So, using a snatch block well anchored it would be possible to brute-force the machine until it was at a point where it could be picked up. One way to make it slide easier on the sled would be to put down a cheap tarp. The tarp would get torn up but the tarp is pretty slippery and for one trip probably would help.

Denis
 
Can you have a rental forklift delivered for the job? My local rigger recommended I call Leavitt and have them drop a big pneumatic tire lift at my place if I wanted to DIY the last job I asked them about, and it seemed like a very economical option.

Have you considered just asking a rigger how they'd do it? Ness-Campbell is local to us in the Portland metro region and all my experiences with them have been exceptional. They have no problem coming out to give quotes and chat about ways to do a move.
 
Can you have a rental forklift delivered for the job? My local rigger recommended I call Leavitt and have them drop a big pneumatic tire lift at my place if I wanted to DIY the last job I asked them about, and it seemed like a very economical option.

Have you considered just asking a rigger how they'd do it? Ness-Campbell is local to us in the Portland metro region and all my experiences with them have been exceptional. They have no problem coming out to give quotes and chat about ways to do a move.
That certainly might work, though the trailer is not a flatbed---it has rails and the deck is between the wheels not over them. So a nice clean lift from the side would not work well. But it might be possible to set it on from the rear and scoot it forward depending on how the trailer is built and what blocking for the trailer might be available.

Denis
 
It may now be irrelevant to this particular move but out of curiosity/necessity I looked up the legality of towing over 10k in Oregon, Idaho and Utah. All three make the same statement and use a similar flowchart.

All three states DO PERMIT you to tow over 10k, so long as your Gross Combined rating is under 26k, and you are doing it non-commercially.
If you are towing commercially, then you cannot tow over 10k without a Class A CDL.

Oregon:
1712018698435.png
 
I would be very tempted to rent a 10K trailer and just make sure the tires add up to your load and then play stupid if anything bad happens. What do you mean I cant put 8k on a 10k trailer? I should be able to put 10k on it!
edit: How much weight can you take off the machine and put in the bed of the truck? Enough to max out the load cap. of the truck and relieve weight off the trailer tires?

People play stupid with towing and overloading vehicles, and it's just that....stupid.

You can play stupid and then the insurance company simply denies coverage because pretty much every policy says the vehicle must be operated legally for the policy to apply. So someone doing what you suggest will have no coverage when the 7-figure lawsuit rolls in after some idiot pulls out in front of you, you can't stop and somebody dies. People think that's a wild theory, but it's not.

Many years ago I drove cement mixer trucks, dump trucks and even asphalt trucks as a summer job during college. I actually started that before CDLs existed, but got one later.

One day I was just cruising along at the speed limit and as I came up to a green light an idiot made a right on red in front of me. I moved over until I was almost hitting oncoming traffic, hit the horn and brakes as hard as I could and still couldn't stop in time. Their car was destroyed, the driver went to the ER and they were cited by the police for failing to yield.

In fact, when the cops showed up their first question was "did your brakes fail?" and I pointed to the skid marks. They asked how heavy the truck was and I told them it was about 30K as I had just a little bit of concrete left in the barrel after the last job. I banged on the barrel to show it was echoing and nowhere near full. They looked at my license, the truck registration, insurance, etc and listened to several witnesses tell them I had a green light that they were waiting to turn across in the opposite direction. The cops sent me on my way and I thought I was totally done with the matter.

A few weeks later, paperwork showed up at my work. The driver filed a suit and claimed I ran a red light. I had to get a lawyer, take the day off and pay a witnesses lost wages to appear and testify on my behalf that I had a green light. The other driver never showed up, and the case was dismissed.

I was doing everything right and wound up in court with about $1K out of pocket. Try that when you're doing something wrong. It won't matter if they did something wrong, the answer will always be "you probably would have been able to stop if you weren't overloaded" or something similar. There's quite a bit of case law precedent for this as well. It's simply a stupid risk to overload vehicles, especially trailers.
 
People play stupid with towing and overloading vehicles, and it's just that....stupid.

You can play stupid and then the insurance company simply denies coverage because pretty much every policy says the vehicle must be operated legally for the policy to apply. So someone doing what you suggest will have no coverage when the 7-figure lawsuit rolls in after some idiot pulls out in front of you, you can't stop and somebody dies. People think that's a wild theory, but it's not.

Many years ago I drove cement mixer trucks, dump trucks and even asphalt trucks as a summer job during college. I actually started that before CDLs existed, but got one later.

One day I was just cruising along at the speed limit and as I came up to a green light an idiot made a right on red in front of me. I moved over until I was almost hitting oncoming traffic, hit the horn and brakes as hard as I could and still couldn't stop in time. Their car was destroyed, the driver went to the ER and they were cited by the police for failing to yield.

In fact, when the cops showed up their first question was "did your brakes fail?" and I pointed to the skid marks. They asked how heavy the truck was and I told them it was about 30K as I had just a little bit of concrete left in the barrel after the last job. I banged on the barrel to show it was echoing and nowhere near full. They looked at my license, the truck registration, insurance, etc and listened to several witnesses tell them I had a green light that they were waiting to turn across in the opposite direction. The cops sent me on my way and I thought I was totally done with the matter.

A few weeks later, paperwork showed up at my work. The driver filed a suit and claimed I ran a red light. I had to get a lawyer, take the day off and pay a witnesses lost wages to appear and testify on my behalf that I had a green light. The other driver never showed up, and the case was dismissed.

I was doing everything right and wound up in court with about $1K out of pocket. Try that when you're doing something wrong. It won't matter if they did something wrong, the answer will always be "you probably would have been able to stop if you weren't overloaded" or something similar. There's quite a bit of case law precedent for this as well. It's simply a stupid risk to overload vehicles, especially trailers.
I guess you missed the part at the end where I suggested pulling as much weight off the trailer and into the truck to stay closer to the "law", which seems to be OK with what I was suggesting in several states.
I looked up the legality of towing over 10k in Oregon, Idaho and Utah. All three make the same statement and use a similar flowchart.
All three states DO PERMIT you to tow over 10k, so long as your Gross Combined rating is under 26k, and you are doing it non-commercially.
 
It may now be irrelevant to this particular move but out of curiosity/necessity I looked up the legality of towing over 10k in Oregon, Idaho and Utah. All three make the same statement and use a similar flowchart.

All three states DO PERMIT you to tow over 10k, so long as your Gross Combined rating is under 26k, and you are doing it non-commercially.
If you are towing commercially, then you cannot tow over 10k without a Class A CDL.

Oregon:
Very good sleuthing! I was wrong as I did not see the non-commercial exception. That is good to know!
I will call the trailer rental agency and let them know I was off base.

As it turns out, because of some generous help from a PM member---gary s moore---I have a much better option for this particular move as long as I can complete the sale.

Denis
 
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Unless you get directed over a weighbridge ,or stopped by the portable scales ,how are the ordinary cops going to know what you weigh.............One thing is that while you will get away with an overload on a trailer towed by a pickup,if yo are caught overloaded on a truck ,you will get fined a considerable sum,.....private ,hobby or commercial.
 
That is good info. Do you know if Wash, Montana and Nevada are the same?

I just looked at our local states, but it was easy enough to find for them. They also all had a "do I need a CDL" flowchart that helped, but the actual statement of the law was on the Class C license info. If you go looking specifically in the commercial law it's not as clear because there is a Commercial Class C, and once you're already looking under the Commercial info it does talk about towing >10k needing a Class A CDL. The key component seems to be that non-commercial towing allows you to tow over 10k as long as the combined towing/towed load is under 26k, at least for these states.
 
And moving a planer mill across state lines is non-commercial? Around these parts even the Friday night dirt track racing guys are treated as commercial. They have a chance to win $500, so DOT says they are commercial. The only group that seems actually get treated as non-commercial are the motorhomes and RVs.

I have found that all of the trailer sellers have negative knowledge about the legality of what they sell. They want to sell a trailer and couldn't care less if you can legally tow it.

In all likelihood you could drive for years with your load and insufficient license and nobody would care. Blow by the scales. Nobody is going to chase a pickup and trailer.
 
If it was easy, everybody would be doing it.
I have done my share of slightly hairy stuff, and then, a lot of times, bit the bullet and hired the right machine.
I do have a 1 ton rolling a frame, and I once broke it down, took it to the old man's farm, set it up again, and loaded the 1910 or so overhead belt drive 16x60 lathe, but it only weighed about a ton.
I have used 1 1/8" subfloor plywood as temporary roadway, ripping it to 2' x 8' sheets, and laying em down in front of the wheels of a forklift, need 3 sets, 4 is better. But its gotta be solid ground, or else you get stuck at the joints. wouldnt trust 3/4", I have broken that with a forklift.
I have towed stuff on steel sheet, that works. a 4x8 of 3/16" that was sitting around, cut a couple of holes at one end, put on shackles, use chain or straps, drag it.
But easier and better has been hiring a knuckleboom crane- Moved my big lathe, which weighs about 7000lbs, with one of those- hundred foot boom, it could reach horizontally inside my 12' garage door and deposit the lathe 40 feet in. I am lucky enough to have a crane guy 2 miles away, as long as its not the season where he is moving 400 head of cattle around.
I have also rented AT extended reach forklifts- telehandlers- and picked big loads from the top with a strap, and used that to load tall trucks. No problems with terrain, as long as its close to flat, and the reach inside a garage, assuming the ceiling is tall enough, can be 20 feet easy.
 








 
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