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Why should an employee have confidence in your business?

Fortunately???....I never had any capital to consume............I went out on my own with a home made arc welder powered by a Ford 10 hp motor ,and a set of tools that cost $40 ,all in the back of an old International truck.....I was very frequently told that I wasnt making wages ,but was completely undeterred.

As an experienced welder myself I can definitely say it is a lower cost barrier to entry than the machining trade.
 
As an experienced welder myself I can definitely say it is a lower cost barrier to entry than the machining trade.

I've made far, far, far more money using my $2000 laptop than I have with well over $50K in machine tools and tooling. And that $50K is a very conservative estimate of what I've spent over the years.

PDW
 
I've made far, far, far more money using my $2000 laptop than I have with well over $50K in machine tools and tooling. And that $50K is a very conservative estimate of what I've spent over the years.

PDW

I have heard of a few guys who wind up with half or more of their business becoming design.
 
Nice,
problem is people lack philosophy, and the understanding that life is meaningless.
The only meaning is that which you apply.
Any what makes you happy is being happy, not a thing.
Learning philosophy should be a required hi school class for your last year.
As well as money and economics.
so life then is nasty, brutish and short. Hobbes, I believe.
Re money and such- never as long as the bankers hold sway; they've been successful at keeping financial knowledge away from the masses.
 
Re money and such- never as long as the bankers hold sway; they've been successful at keeping financial knowledge away from the masses.
They used to could keep it away, not anymore.

My brother in law after an accounting degree, was a corporate investor for Wells Fargo for most of his life, a group of them about 10 years ago set out on their own creating their own corporate investment business.

I started a little machine shop, readed a few books, and some learned on my own, we got about the same amount of invested funds and toys, he has boats and cars, I have CNC machines :D

First thing one should learn about money, is the ideology that someone keeps you from something is not true, you keep yourself, and that is just an excuse.
 
They used to could keep it away, not anymore.

My brother in law after an accounting degree, was a corporate investor for Wells Fargo for most of his life, a group of them about 10 years ago set out on their own creating their own corporate investment business.

I started a little machine shop, readed a few books, and some learned on my own, we got about the same amount of invested funds and toys, he has boats and cars, I have CNC machines :D

First thing one should learn about money, is the ideology that someone keeps you from something is not true, you keep yourself, and that is just an excuse.

Yeah but wouldn’t the CNC’s be a business expense where as, the boats and cars a personal expense? Seriously though I’d also be the guy to spend my own money on CNC’s.
 
Yeah but wouldn’t the CNC’s be a business expense where as, the boats and cars a personal expense? Seriously though I’d also be the guy to spend my own money on CNC’s.
Yeah he likes liabilities(toys) I like assets (CNC toys)
he does have investment stocks and a couple beach houses on some island somewhere they rent out.
they had to sell one during the pandemic 🤮
but they also have the cost of the staff for those also.

My dad was the hardest working person i have ever seen, was and is poor.
But also when the 9-5 work was done, that was the end, home and beer-thirty.

What he didn't know was you need to work 'smarter' not harder.

and that "what you do with your free time affects your life the most"
 
Yeah he likes liabilities(toys) I like assets (CNC toys)
he does have investment stocks and a couple beach houses on some island somewhere they rent out.
they had to sell one during the pandemic 🤮
but they also have the cost of the staff for those also.

My dad was the hardest working person i have ever seen, was and is poor.
But also when the 9-5 work was done, that was the end, home and beer-thirty.

What he didn't know was you need to work 'smarter' not harder.

and that "what you do with your free time affects your life the most"

My dad was the same way.
 
We were talking expensive healthcare in US also, a cheat we have done is.
The person with the lowest paying skill set(my wife) gets a job at a large corporation with near free healthcare.
Sometimes she gets paid ok, some times great, but the healthcare deduction from our personal finances is always big.

Currently best of both worlds, she gets paid $80k, and near free insurance.

Real life game of monopoly! :D
 
We were talking expensive healthcare in US also, a cheat we have done is.
The person with the lowest paying skill set(my wife) gets a job at a large corporation with near free healthcare.
Sometimes she gets paid ok, some times great, but the healthcare deduction from our personal finances is always big.

Currently best of both worlds, she gets paid $80k, and near free insurance.

Real life game of monopoly! :D

This just reminded me of something. I love hearing how people start businesses. Mostly because I like the stories but also because I want to see what I might be able to replicate. There are always those who start with money so I cross them off my list after I hear their cool story.

But one other really common this is how many businesses are floated by money from a wife’s job or whatever. I can completely understand why people do that, because it makes sense to.

But it’s hard to relate to when you have been alone your entire adult life. I often wonder how many businesses would not have gotten off the ground if there wasn’t a second income to live on.
 
Employer pays you for ~40 hours/week.

You need to find something else in the other hours and do it.
100%

People "generally" need (or maybe not) 8 hours to sleep, people generally work 8 hours... what you do with the remaining 8 hours often times defines the rate of success you will see in the work 8 hours.

If one is spending those 8 remaining hours (or whatever the number is) on things that are not pushing the goals forward (i.e. gaming, NetFlix, club hopping, drugs, excessive drinking, Social Media (that one is for me... I waste way too much time on that trash) etc...), that's on us. If we're not investing our own personal time in our own personal and professional development, well, why on earth should an employer invest in us?
 
They used to could keep it away, not anymore.
>>The web is a wonderful thing. Before, you needed a mentor or friend or family member to point you the way.
I started a little machine shop, readed a few books, and some learned on my own, we got about the same amount of invested funds and toys, he has boats and cars, I have CNC machines
>> CNC folks have a different mindset, kind of a technician. I liked the manual kit, you were more of a craftsman. If I tried it as a business, CNC is the only way, not only for the productivity gains but also because folks with the manual machine skillset are nearly extinct. Yeah, some aspects of neo-Luddism in there.

First thing one should learn about money, is the ideology that someone keeps you from something is not true, you keep yourself, and that is just an excuse.
>>True but financial knowledge, if not suppressed, isn't widely promoted either. I suspect the bankers like it that way.
 
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This just reminded me of something. I love hearing how people start businesses. Mostly because I like the stories but also because I want to see what I might be able to replicate. There are always those who start with money so I cross them off my list after I hear their cool story.

But one other really common this is how many businesses are floated by money from a wife’s job or whatever. I can completely understand why people do that, because it makes sense to.

But it’s hard to relate to when you have been alone your entire adult life. I often wonder how many businesses would not have gotten off the ground if there wasn’t a second income to live on.
Have a rich buddy that always touts how awesome his business is,
and that his MBA friends business's don't do as well as his.

But he never mentions his wife has an NBA, and makes a couple buck$ herself.
And that he grew up in an affluent environment with skills learned already that others
have to search for.
 
Have a rich buddy that always touts how awesome his business is,
and that his MBA friends business's don't do as well as his.

But he never mentions his wife has an NBA, and makes a couple buck$ herself.
And that he grew up in an affluent environment with skills learned already that others
have to search for.
as some here might know, i came here with our family 26 years ago, from an actual communist country. i was 14 years old and knew less than nothing.
started working in california vineyards picking grapes for 3-4 bucks/hr and spent all my money on all the cool new stuff that america had to offer, that i couldnt have dreamed of back home. not a single person ever talked to me about savings, 401k, investing, anything like that. much less middle school and high schools... well into my early 30's i just lived day by day, paycheck to paycheck :(
a lot of that is my fault for sure, but boy it sure would have been nice to be told about the harsh realities of life when a kid's still in high school...
but of course that'll NEVER happen in our current system. having to break my back working double time now to catch up on 2 decades of fucking off aint fun
 
as some here might know, i came here with our family 26 years ago, from an actual communist country. i was 14 years old and knew less than nothing.
started working in california vineyards picking grapes for 3-4 bucks/hr and spent all my money on all the cool new stuff that america had to offer, that i couldnt have dreamed of back home. not a single person ever talked to me about savings, 401k, investing, anything like that. much less middle school and high schools... well into my early 30's i just lived day by day, paycheck to paycheck :(
a lot of that is my fault for sure, but boy it sure would have been nice to be told about the harsh realities of life when a kid's still in high school...
but of course that'll NEVER happen in our current system. having to break my back working double time now to catch up on 2 decades of fucking off aint fun
I had never thought about how it is in other countries when I was younger. In the US we take a lot for granted. I saw this video some time back and tried to put myself in this man's shoes.

 
I was watching an interview with a bodybuilder from the 70’s and 80’s. He knew Arnold Schwarzenegger and said that Arnold being an immigrant had a mindset to where he felt that in America he could be anything he wanted to be if he worked hard enough.

He said that it took an immigrant like Arnold for him to realise his own opportunities in his own country.
 
I was watching an interview with a bodybuilder from the 70’s and 80’s. He knew Arnold Schwarzenegger and said that Arnold being an immigrant had a mindset to where he felt that in America he could be anything he wanted to be if he worked hard enough.

He said that it took an immigrant like Arnold for him to realise his own opportunities in his own country.
while america has a LOT of faults... that still rings true, that anyone with a vision and determination can achieve anything he/she wants. but it does take a cult-like approach to it.
 
Due to the nature of my job I talk with a lot of people in the industry and I am in a LOT of shops as well. At least 100 shops every year. In those shops I am privileged to meet many of the owners. There are SO many shops owned and/or run by immigrants. Personally I like to hear their story. Not just how they started their shops, but how they got here... to the USA.

The overarching theme among nearly all of them is that The USA is a unique place in this world. For all of its faults, it is STILL a place where you can be the master of your own destiny. Chances are whatever it is, it won't be easy, but the reality is nothing in life that is worthwhile in a long term sense is easy. Do HARD things. Do the things lazy people refuse to do and more often than not you'll be rewarded. If not, move on. That place isn't for you. Find the place that is... and no matter what, without fail, DO. HARD. THINGS. !
 
Find the place that is... and no matter what, without fail, DO. HARD. THINGS. !
Man, I can't agree more strongly with what James has written!

I think what (far too) many people forget is that "if it were easy, we'd ALL be doing it!" Sometimes trying harder and/or longer is your competitive advantage. So many "overnight successes" were actually 20 years in the making. It's sorta like an iceberg, you only see the part of it that's above the waterline.

It certainly helps to be smart, but all things being equal, effort/heart/moxie/whatever you want to call it can still be your secret weapon.

"Success comes in cans, failure in cants!"

Cheers, Brian
 
Due to the nature of my job I talk with a lot of people in the industry and I am in a LOT of shops as well. At least 100 shops every year. In those shops I am privileged to meet many of the owners. There are SO many shops owned and/or run by immigrants. Personally I like to hear their story. Not just how they started their shops, but how they got here... to the USA.

The overarching theme among nearly all of them is that The USA is a unique place in this world. For all of its faults, it is STILL a place where you can be the master of your own destiny. Chances are whatever it is, it won't be easy, but the reality is nothing in life that is worthwhile in a long term sense is easy. Do HARD things. Do the things lazy people refuse to do and more often than not you'll be rewarded. If not, move on. That place isn't for you. Find the place that is... and no matter what, without fail, DO. HARD. THINGS. !

It’s the same here in New Zealand with Indians and Asian’s. Take Asian’s. Many here open a Chinese food restaurant in a building smaller than some people’s bathrooms. These guys will work 15 hour days 7 days a week. Not for big money either.

But for them that is still better than where they came from. Hard work yes but they can actually earn a living even if only a modest one and it still better than back home.

That is the big problem between 1st world and 3rd world. Guys in 3rd world countries have seen real poverty so a barebones basic life in a 1st world country is like living like a king to them.

That doesn’t fly for people who are used to 1st world living.
 








 
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