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"Win the Lottery" Home Garage Machine(s)?

Beach somewhere exotic**, supermodels (new one every day) licking cocaine off my hardware, then I'd return the favor.

And

I'd buy the best Mori lathe and VMC availible. None of this Haas/Brother/kent etc etc bullshit.

**Somewhere that hasn't been spoiled by ex-pat Russians and Ukrainians, like Thailand.
 
Well there's filthy rich home shop and there's hobby home shop..............

Hobby wise I'd have two machines I already have on my shop floor...........a speedio with a 4th and a simple 2x Lynx lathe.

Filthy rich..........I'd still have the hobby shop machines and maybe some more fab equipment. I'd leave machining as an income in a heart beat if'n I had a few mill in the bank...........too many other interesting things out there for me..........

Now back to reality.............set'n up a PIA part that I don't want to make while looking out the window at a beautiful sunny morning...................(I'd rather be choppin' wood)
 
I'm toying with a design for a detached man cave/garage for when we build a new home in a few years. Think Iron man and Batman workshop.

Poured and slab concrete construction included. Open floor plan, partially sub terrain. Raised area for the poker and pool table. Office in the back. Lots of glass and wood accents.

The main area will be for the few machines. Probably an Okuma 660 with a trunnion and a turning center of some kind. I am mostly interested in doing all the tinkering I am putting off to do real paying work. I've got 2 lifetimes worth of ideas I want get out of my head.

Oh, and I'm going to have a Porsche in there too. If I do it right I'll never have to leave the property

Give me 10 years. It'll likely cost more than the home construction.
 
Speedio M300.

For a machine nerd, a Kern is the obvious choice just because the thing allows you to do an incredible number of processes. Milling (of course), interpolated turning, surface and cylindrical grinding, even rose engine/gillouchet work. It is the machine for uber machine nerds, made by uber machine nerds.

Two problems with the Kern - the running costs are very high the more you want to get into the nerdy stuff. Lottery schmottery - you invest the principal and live off the interest. The $750k acquisition cost is just the buy-in for a world of highly exotic tooling from Euro companies most people have never heard of making unicorn blood coated and diamond tools.

Second problem with a Kern - it has a very very tiny work envelope. This is a machine really made for doing jewelry (watchmakers are Kern's primary customer). The work envelope is *tiny*.

M300 though? Cheap to run! Can do most of the same tricks as a Kern, but to 12 microns instead of 2. Grinding, turning, full 5 axis milling. Massive work envelope for the size (450mm jig diameter by 310mm tall). Easy to run, wood-burning stove reliable, far more accurate than a sub $200k machine deserves to be. I've done more M200/M300 projects than anywhere else in the world at this point, and everyone who owns the things is blown away by how well they work. No employee discounts at Yamazen, but I probably only have a few more years as a sales guy in me, and I'll be buying an M300 as the core of my next schtick.
 
Won the machine tool lottery ? For manual lathe, let me present the following... :leaving:


That's a solid answer,

but you would also have to consider a Babin rebuild of a Hardinge 5C:

 
loto win, I would buy a new1460 lathe with a taper attachment,
and new surface grinder or a fresh scraped rebuild.
Might even buy a grinder big enough to be a way grinder.

Not as much fun but:
For producing parte a multy spindle Tornos might be the berries.
Tornos mini machine, (not a multi spindle but a fast multi tool lathe)
 
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I'd buy the most bad ass food truck I could. Screw the hotdog cart.

HappyasLarry-84.jpg
 
Speedio M300.

The Brother multi-tasking machines are very interesting to me. Do they work as more general-purpose machines? Understanding of course it's not a knee mill, I'm not going to stick an engine block on it, but I'm not sure I have a good feel for what the work envelope looks like on those. They'd work great for a lot of the parts I do but every so often I do something 12"x2"x1" or something like that.

Also, how are these on single phase power? I've only got 100A right now but should be able to upgrade to 200A within the next year. And yes, that's power dedicated to the shop, not the whole house.

I am mostly interested in doing all the tinkering I am putting off to do real paying work. I've got 2 lifetimes worth of ideas I want get out of my head.
^^^ bingo ^^^

I'd buy the most bad ass food truck I could.
That's a food tank!
 
The Brother multi-tasking machines are very interesting to me. Do they work as more general-purpose machines? Understanding of course it's not a knee mill, I'm not going to stick an engine block on it, but I'm not sure I have a good feel for what the work envelope looks like on those. They'd work great for a lot of the parts I do but every so often I do something 12"x2"x1" or something like that.

The M300 has a 450mm swing clearance diameter, but the X travel is (as is the Brother naming convention) 300mm. The original genesis of the machine was small/medium bell housing castings for finish turning, holes, and mating features (think: alternators, EV motor housing ends). It will handle big parts, but if you're thinking of it purely as a 5 axis mill, I generally tell customers that the ideal mill part fits in a 300mm x 300 x 120mm envelope. You can go bigger, but you'll be interpolating the C axis a bunch to get access around the entire perimeter when you go past that 300mm X axis direction.

For bigger parts, there is the U500, but you lose the turning capability.

If you do parts that fit in the above prescribed envelope though, you simply won't find a machine with this kind of reliability, accuracy, or flexibility for anywhere near the price.

Also, how are these on single phase power? I've only got 100A right now but should be able to upgrade to 200A within the next year. And yes, that's power dedicated to the shop, not the whole house.

A 50A breaker is enough to run any of our machines. Older models like mine could often get away on 30A, but that was below the book rate.
 
Probably already mentioned, but I sure wish I had a 4 ton bridge crane.
I'm planning a 1-ton as it happens.

The original genesis of the machine was small/medium bell housing castings for finish turning, holes, and mating features (think: alternators, EV motor housing ends).
Yeah - I definitely got the sense it was very optimized for that type of part. Some of the stuff I build fits that general idea and it would be a great machine if I ever ended up wanting to make a hundred of them at a time instead of one. But as of right now that's just a "maybe" and I’d want a machine that suits most of the work I do.

It will handle big parts, but if you're thinking of it purely as a 5 axis mill, I generally tell customers that the ideal mill part fits in a 300mm x 300 x 120mm envelope.
Hmmm… that is actually a lot closer to what I really work with 95% of the time. Is the M200 the same idea (200 x 200 x ?)

What are the limitations like running turned parts? I mill a lot of my round parts because I don't have a CNC lathe and they're usually only 1-2" long. What is the changeover process like to switch between a 3-jaw chuck and a vise?
 
Hmmm… that is actually a lot closer to what I really work with 95% of the time. Is the M200 the same idea (200 x 200 x ?)

What are the limitations like running turned parts? I mill a lot of my round parts because I don't have a CNC lathe and they're usually only 1-2" long. What is the changeover process like to switch between a 3-jaw chuck and a vise?

M200 is the same concept- outside of those specialty, big finish turn parts- keep the XY part within the travels- 200mm x 200mm. Height is a little shorter as well ~ 100mm.

The M series machines are *not* turning monsters. Think of them as the opposite of a milling lathe - 90% Mill/10% lathe. Milling the bulk of material off is your best bet- use the turning for finish only. The machine won’t blow up if you rough turn on it- you’ll just be more efficient with an end mill.

My job shop M series customers are all on Lang zero point setups. You can spin these up to 3k RPM, so it is 1 minute to go from a 5 axis vise, to a 3 jaw chuck, to a dovetail fixture, to a pallet of parts, to a 5C collet block.

I have customers doing 5 axis milling, turning, and grinding in the same setup. Soon, there will be a factory option that will allow cylindrical grinding. Within the envelopes I’ve talked about, i don’t think it’s possible to find a more flexible or accurate machine for anything short of literally 3x the price.
 
I'd just start a brewery
Kidding aside, I have some industry friends and craft beer has been going through a Great Depression of sorts the past few years. The category grew like crazy for 20 years starting around the mid 90s, but by ~10 years ago was starting to get very crowded. Go to the store and look at how many booboo berry hazy sour IPAs there are on the shelf.

Now it has to compete with (in many states) legal weed, 20somethings are actually drinking less, and the ones who do are drinking more alco-seltzer so they stay skinny for Instagram. Many (most?) craft breweries are partly-owned by the big guys and playing the same big-money games buying shelf space, taps, etc. because the category is over-supplied.

The places that are doing well are increasingly about on-premise consumption, essentially becoming bars/restaurants that may also sell packaged beer. As always, there's always room in the market for somebody who makes a great/unique product. I'll also say that the level of gear and technique available to home brewers for not huge $ is really amazing.
 
Kidding aside, I have some industry friends and craft beer has been going through a Great Depression of sorts the past few years.

Being in Portland, I know a couple of the craft brew brand guys.

As rough as manufacturing is to be in, I think the only worst industry to step into would be restaurants/food. The craft brew guys are cooler, and hipper, and fitter compared to us here in Mordor making stuff, but they have (in my experience) way higher incidents of depression, general anxiety, and the daily stress of managing such a people-centric industry is just insane.

There are very few easy ways to make a decent living in this world. Hospitality would be almost dead-last on my list.
 
There are very few easy ways to make a decent living in this world. Hospitality would be almost dead-last on my list.
Very true. I worked at a pizzeria in NY growing up and it was a very valuable education for an otherwise well-off and overeducated kid. I can still wash dishes and do prep really fast. I actually have worked as a restaurant critic on the side so have gotten to know a lot of folks in the business over the years at the fine dining level. A friend once joked that it's like Hollywood but the pay sucks and the coke is a lot more stepped on. The thing that sticks out for me is how many people in that business I've known who died young. It just seems like an incredibly hard way of life, and for some it's the one way to stay off the streets and out of jail.

The M series machines are *not* turning monsters. Think of them as the opposite of a milling lathe - 90% Mill/10% lathe. Milling the bulk of material off is your best bet- use the turning for finish only. The machine won’t blow up if you rough turn on it- you’ll just be more efficient with an end mill.
Got it - makes total sense. I'll take further questions to PMs.
 
Kidding aside, I have some industry friends and craft beer has been going through a Great Depression of sorts the past few years. The category grew like crazy for 20 years starting around the mid 90s, but by ~10 years ago was starting to get very crowded. Go to the store and look at how many booboo berry hazy sour IPAs there are on the shelf.

Now it has to compete with (in many states) legal weed, 20somethings are actually drinking less, and the ones who do are drinking more alco-seltzer so they stay skinny for Instagram. Many (most?) craft breweries are partly-owned by the big guys and playing the same big-money games buying shelf space, taps, etc. because the category is over-supplied.

The places that are doing well are increasingly about on-premise consumption, essentially becoming bars/restaurants that may also sell packaged beer. As always, there's always room in the market for somebody who makes a great/unique product. I'll also say that the level of gear and technique available to home brewers for not huge $ is really amazing.
I never said I'd serve anyone beer.............I'd just start a brewery for my own consumption:D................and yeah, any type of hospitality biz would suck. No way I'd every want to deal with the general public.
 








 
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