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Year of Mfg of Monarch 10EE

marka12161

Stainless
Joined
Dec 23, 2016
Location
Oswego, NY USA
I picked this up earlier this week along with a nice Bridgeport and a bunch of tooling. The prior owner had passed on and his widow was cleaning out his stuff. Both machines and the tooling are welcome additions to the shop. The number stamped on the ways of the 10EE are: "Lot No. EE13283". The prior owner's widow thought it was a late '50s machine but from what i've read, i'm guessing early to mid 40's. Can anyone help establish the date of manufacture?
 

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My S/N ref book would place that S/N about 1942. You might check the S/N "Sticky Thread" at the top of the Monarch forum as well.

 
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I picked this up earlier this week along with a nice Bridgeport and a bunch of tooling. The prior owner had passed on and his widow was cleaning out his stuff. Both machines and the tooling are welcome additions to the shop. The number stamped on the ways of the 10EE are: "Lot No. EE13283". The prior owner's widow thought it was a late '50s machine but from what i've read, i'm guessing early to mid 40's. Can anyone help establish the date of manufacture?
Serial book just lists numbers - not which line of lathes they refer to - and from that, I see your machine is possibly from 1942. The seriial book further suggests that OVER 10000 Monarch lathes were built that year
 
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As I recall, the round dial machines were replaced by the square dials around 1945-46. Does it not have a build tag with the date of manufacture on the base somewhere? Either way, call Monarch and they can provide information on it.

Andy
 
Thanks guys. No builders tag. I got some documentation with it but the date is illegible. it looks like the last digit in the year field is a 2 so i'm guessing 1942.
 
The seriial book further suggests that OVER 10000 Monarch lathes were built that year

That seems like a whole lotta lathes in one year. It was the war years, and a lot was produced. I wonder if some of those s/n's covered various specilaized tooling, machines returned for repurpose, rework, special projects, etc. IOW... each s/n may not represent a discreet full standalone machine tool that was delivered.

I worked for a company that built laser module prototypes. Every contract we took in, whether it was a research paper, a table top lab experiment, a breadboard system, or one particular mechanical/laser/electronics module, or a system with many components. It was assigned a project #. And various components of a project might have dash #'s to identify sub-components of that project. The project number was the base for any S/N's assigned.

Just wondering if all of those s/n's were totally standalone machines. Or some were just "Other Business Endeavors"?

Don't know myself.
 
That seems like a whole lotta lathes in one year. It was the war years, and a lot was produced. I wonder if some of those s/n's covered various specilaized tooling, machines returned for repurpose, rework, special projects, etc. IOW... each s/n may not represent a discreet full standalone machine tool that was delivered.

I worked for a company that built laser module prototypes. Every contract we took in, whether it was a research paper, a table top lab experiment, a breadboard system, or one particular mechanical/laser/electronics module, or a system with many components. It was assigned a project #. And various components of a project might have dash #'s to identify sub-components of that project. The project number was the base for any S/N's assigned.

Just wondering if all of those s/n's were totally standalone machines. Or some were just "Other Business Endeavors"?

Don't know myself.
It does seem a fantastic number of extra fancy mechanical assemblies
 








 
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