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yet another STUPID video from practical machinist youtube page

i wouldnt call it a collaboration, certainly not with me not censoring myself...
If @IanSandusky got you a trip to California, the two of you toured the factory with Mark Terryberry or one of those guys, you saw them producing and inspecting parts to MTB tolerances on their own machines, you couldn't concede? :LOL:

YouTube collabs are all the rage these days. I just saw the Titans guys making a part for Gas Monkey Garage.
 
If @IanSandusky got you a trip to California, the two of you toured the factory with Mark Terryberry or one of those guys, you saw them producing and inspecting parts to MTB tolerances on their own machines, you couldn't concede? :LOL:

YouTube collabs are all the rage these days. I just saw the Titans guys making a part for Gas Monkey Garage.
what do tolerances have to do with it?
 
The only point I was trying to make is stating a company WILL be more profitable buying a “higher end” machine is false or an opinion and one can also not claim they have an advantage over a competing shop by having a “higher end” machine than the other, circumstantial. Most customers, whether it be a purchaser, buyer, engineer sending out the PO doesn’t care what brand machine you have and in a lot of circumstances don’t even know the difference between brands let alone type. So what’s the advantage?

I’ve worked for two larger companies, that had rows of machines, the one common problem with having 20, 30 however many machines it may be is operators, employees, 1 guy swapping parts in 2 or 3 machines, and machines end up sitting. So great you have a high end machine that can accomplish a part in 12 minutes but it takes an operator 10 minutes to get to it to swap a part and the neighbor shops lower end machine takes 18. Without getting all technical but this is exactly what I meant by there are so many factors that come in to play.

And I don’t disagree with @empower stating side by side a lower end machine vs a higher end machine, the higher end will out perform, of course it will. So will a Ferrari against a Ford Taurus.
My comment had nothing to do with high end versus low end machine use. I was talking about the entire process from material to completed part. Machine speed is less important than total operation time. What good is having a great cycle time if you have to stop every 5 minutes to clean out chips because your chip evac can't keep up.
 
that was EXTREMELY painful to watch...
mostly basic, elementary info. except when he said adaptive clearing is used for finishing? wut...
You must not watch Youtube, that's how they are taught to finish at Youtube University, cracks me up when I can see HSM paths on the floor of someone's parts :bawling:
 
You must not watch Youtube, that's how they are taught to finish at Youtube University, cracks me up when I can see HSM paths on the floor of someone's parts :bawling:
Tell us where you get/got your technical education? From a trade school? From taking classes at a community college? What do you consider to be the source of all knowledge? This is a genuine question since this joking about YouTube is a theme for you.
 
Tell us where you get/got your technical education? From a trade school? From taking classes at a community college? What do you consider to be the source of all knowledge? This is a genuine question since this joking about YouTube is a theme for you.
Don't get me wrong, I just like fkn around. There are a lot of places to gain good knowledge, even on Youtube!, You do have to dig to find it though.
This video was a legit information video of course.

The big thing I HATE! about Youtube is the "I did it, and you can to" movement, I coined it.
It's people selling the "dream" to others, and the "dream" is to own your own business, in the form of whatever the channel is, machining, woodworking, candle making....
even though they haven't even achieved it, now they are teaching others how to do it, when they don't even know how to do it.
Its not as big in machining, its huge in woodworking, and a lot of other areas though.

The deal is they get some equipment, watch a bunch of videos from other people on Youtube that know just barely more than they do (maybe), then they set off to start a channel on how to start a machine shop,
but the thing is they have no idea, most the time they have a couple months experience with what ever equipment they have, and almost always they know nothing about machining(or what ever context) or business either.
I like to call this "The blind leading the blind" channels.

Some of these channels have gotten huge, and real bad, like NYCCNC, Jon Saunders has created an entire business model and product line, selling the dream, and he sells it in the form of crap vises, fixture plates, blind leading the blind training classes, Its a genius marketing idea, and its sad people buy into it. All because people watched a guy with a business degree buy a Taig, and then Tormach to try to create and bring a product to market, an automated target system,
the product failed, but got so many people to watch his progress on Youtube over the years, he just kept going with that, selling people the I did it, and you can too" but he didnt do it, his product failed.
 
Tell us where you get/got your technical education? From a trade school? From taking classes at a community college? What do you consider to be the source of all knowledge? This is a genuine question since this joking about YouTube is a theme for you.
Also machining is one of those technical trades where the saying is implied " It takes 10% of the time to learn 90%, but 90% of your time to learn the last 10%"
So as you can see it might only take 4 years to learn 90% of machining, but to learn most of what a lot of old intellectual machinist might know, that may take you another 20-40 years.

I have noticed this with almost every technical field I have been in.

The last 10% is usually made up of all the small little, it only happens every once in a while but its a factual thing that most will come to the conclusion of, but it might take 10-20 years before you come upon it.
Now the thing is, there are hundreds of these things, so it takes a lot of time to gain this wisdom, unless someone with this wisdom tells you, and someone told him some of them also......
Well there isnt a lot of that 10% information happening on Youtube, its the guy still at the start of learning the 90% part, and some of them even come to argue on here, and I notice even more so the people that actually know, stay quiet most of the time.

There are differences in skill, education, intelligence, and wisdom, and they are each different, and wisdom takes time unless a wise one tells you what wisdom he knows.
 
The big thing I HATE! about Youtube is the "I did it, and you can to" movement, I coined it.
It's people selling the "dream" to others, and the "dream" is to own your own business, in the form of whatever the channel is, machining, woodworking, candle making....
even though they haven't even achieved it, now they are teaching others how to do it, when they don't even know how to do it.
Its not as big in machining, its huge in woodworking, and a lot of other areas though.

You don't like watching 20-something year old, man-bun wearing hipsters with sleeve tattoos restore old axes and make epoxy tables while trying to sell you their very own brand of beard balm?

Or how bout the young couples calling themselves "house flippers" while taking videos of themselves installing vinyl plank flooring and building "cute" wall features from pallet slats like they saw on tik-tak... no love for them either? Lol
 
Don't get me wrong, I just like fkn around. There are a lot of places to gain good knowledge, even on Youtube!, You do have to dig to find it though.
This video was a legit information video of course.
You made good points in there and I agree with a lot of it. At the same time, where do we get this information if not YouTube?

Also machining is one of those technical trades where the saying is implied " It takes 10% of the time to learn 90%, but 90% of your time to learn the last 10%"
So as you can see it might only take 4 years to learn 90% of machining, but to learn most of what a lot of old intellectual machinist might know, that may take you another 20-40 years.
I get your point but, don't agree with the percentages. I used to teach Excel and found it hilarious when people claimed they were "experts in Excel." I wrote more than 1000 lines of code for an Excel application and I'd consider myself middle skill at best (maybe 30% and I could shame most regular, corporate users).

I think there are some very smart people on here but, ain't any of us total experts in the field. There is just too much to learn and know. The second you think you know it, the goal posts moved again. That constant change and evolution is what pushes everything else forward. If anyone gets to real, actual 50% knowledge in this industry, after a lifetime, they're doing pretty well.
 








 
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