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yet another STUPID video from practical machinist youtube page

You don't like watching 20-something year old, man-bun wearing hipsters with sleeve tattoos restore old axes and make epoxy tables while trying to sell you their very own brand of beard balm?

Or how bout the young couples calling themselves "house flippers" while taking videos of themselves installing vinyl plank flooring and building "cute" wall features from pallet slats like they saw on tik-tak... no love for them either? Lol
Exactly!!! i would have some respect if it was a real estate investor who had been investing and flipping houses for 20 years,
and now as a multi billionaire, fuq it, I'mna show others how I did it.
That would be legit, but that's not what's on their.

Same with machining, and some of those people come on here with Youtube cult knowledge that isnt actually machinist group knowledge but incorrect Youtube cult knowledge and try to argue.
Like I used to tell my employee's, "your confused, I'm not asking you, I'm telling you"
Don't know how many times I said that on a Youtube comment :D
 
to be fair, i learned a LOT from youtube. but not by taking things people on there say as gospel, more like inspiration to try different things on my own and figure out what works for me. so i definitely cant say that its ALL bad, but there is a LOT of cringe shit on there unfortunately :(
 
You made good points in there and I agree with a lot of it. At the same time, where do we get this information if not YouTube?

From where everyone else got it, get a job doing it with a wise machinist, who got it, from working a dozen shops or more with other wise machinists, but also some of those guys do make some content.
and some of them are on this forum, most are probably lookers not talkers, shaking their heads half the time,
remember, I'm in the middle, I'm not new, but only been doing it for 15-17 years, but was trained for most those years all day every day, buy multiple 30+ year guys trained by other multiple 20+ year guys from dozens of shops knowledge.
And I'm old enough (50) to know this is how shit works, In almost all technical fields
.

I get your point but, don't agree with the percentages. I used to teach Excel and found it hilarious when people claimed they were "experts in Excel." I wrote more than 1000 lines of code for an Excel application and I'd consider myself middle skill at best (maybe 30% and I could shame most regular, corporate users).
yeah its hard to compare people really.

I think there are some very smart people on here but, ain't any of us total experts in the field. There is just too much to learn and know. The second you think you know it, the goal posts moved again. That constant change and evolution is what pushes everything else forward. If anyone gets to real, actual 50% knowledge in this industry, after a lifetime, they're doing pretty well.
This is one of those fields, like most that,
the more you learn, the more you know you don't know shit.
because everything is bigger than you thought it actually was. down the rabbit hole
 
to be fair, i learned a LOT from youtube. but not by taking things people on there say as gospel, more like inspiration to try different things on my own and figure out what works for me. so i definitely cant say that its ALL bad, but there is a LOT of cringe shit on there unfortunately :(
I have definitely learned some stuff from Youtube, the sad thing is the people that dont know the channel their watching is bullshit, because they have no context.
 
My business has grown a lot from the things we've implemented from the things people have shared with us

Could you make videos about your work? Maybe show the real life implementation of said things?

How do YOU handle tool libraries and tool numbers between CAM and machines? How do YOU like to approach fixturing parts? What do YOU struggle with and what are your weak points you'd like to improve on.

A fair number of your video topics come from OUR conversations. Someone will come here asking for advice or looking for input and we'll get a decent tread going. You come along silently; take the knowledge that we share here - be it assistance, critique or advice; and you work it into your own assessment; speaking as if you are a subject matter expert on the topic - I have seen you nearly quote my posts at least once.

Honestly Ian, none of that would bother me if you participated in our conversations. As it stands, I cannot help but feel like an animal being farmed for your monetized content.

I have no problem with you doing your thing and making money; it's the principal of the matter I take issue with. You have plenty of time to read through our threads in search of content, yet you never offer anything in return.

Maybe you could share some insights with us here on content creation, video editing software, camera gear, lighting, branding, marketing, ect.
Many of us could benefit from your participation similar to how you benefit from ours - it's not sarcasm, I mean that genuinely.
 
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I have definitely learned some stuff from Youtube, the sad thing is the people that dont know the channel their watching is bullshit, because they have no context.
You can take Jon Saunders out of context and say he didn't know what he was doing but, that was kind of the point of his videos. He started as a complete desktop hobbyist in an apartment. His hobby grew, then he started doing small jobs, then he needed more machine, more jobs, more machine, more jobs.

He designed and sells lower-cost work holding in a market where Jergens, Lang, etc, cost more than the machines most of these buyers are using (Tormach, etc). Much the same story for Pierson.

Palletizing is the current thinking that all the work holding companies are pushing. Their products follow that on a smaller scale and cost.

I personally watch content from both of them for the ideas on small business organizing or problems. Pierson is fanatical about the practical application of Lean and shares a lot of ideas I like.

Saunders found an avenue to give back to the industry by setting up training, as well as expanding his own line of small-machine work holding. He's done a ton of awesome videos on Fusion.

I think for both of them: tossing themselves into the middle of all of this, meeting people and immersing themselves in the industry is their method for learning. We're all learning from arguing about it. :D
 
You can take Jon Saunders out of context and say he didn't know what he was doing but, that was kind of the point of his videos. He started as a complete desktop hobbyist in an apartment. His hobby grew, then he started doing small jobs, then he needed more machine, more jobs, more machine, more jobs.

He designed and sells lower-cost work holding in a market where Jergens, Lang, etc, cost more than the machines most of these buyers are using (Tormach, etc). Much the same story for Pierson.

Palletizing is the current thinking that all the work holding companies are pushing. Their products follow that on a smaller scale and cost.

I personally watch content from both of them for the ideas on small business organizing or problems. Pierson is fanatical about the practical application of Lean and shares a lot of ideas I like.

Saunders found an avenue to give back to the industry by setting up training, as well as expanding his own line of small-machine work holding. He's done a ton of awesome videos on Fusion.

I think for both of them: tossing themselves into the middle of all of this, meeting people and immersing themselves in the industry is their method for learning. We're all learning from arguing about it. :D
They both have something to be learned, mostly in the form of business, not machining.
Jon has a business degree, and is running a successful manufacturing business. gives insights into this a lot.
Jay is passing along lean principles from mainly Toyota, but in context of his own business implementation, showing what his manufacturing business has done,
gives good ideas. (y)
 
You can take Jon Saunders out of context and say he didn't know what he was doing but, that was kind of the point of his videos. He started as a complete desktop hobbyist in an apartment. His hobby grew, then he started doing small jobs, then he needed more machine, more jobs, more machine, more jobs.
Actually, have you really followed his channel, I watched it, that is not what he did. (took jobs, needed more machine, more jobs...) that isn't what he did at all.
He quickly became the poster boy for Tormach and switched his business to a Youtube channel, and training people on Tormach and Fusion.
He was never a job shop or etc.

edit: actually he explains his timeline in a few videos.
 
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Honestly Ian, it wouldn't bother me nearly as much if you actually participated in our conversations. As it stands, I cannot help but feel like an animal being farmed for your monetized content.

I have no problem with you doing your thing and making money; it's the principal of the matter I take issue with. You have plenty of time to read through our threads in search of content, yet you never offer anything in return.
Don't forget that he's not Practical Machinist. He has his own channel, with almost 7K subscribers (Practical Machinist has ten times that).


Practical Machinist (whoever that is) is presumably who comes up with the ideas for videos. We're all guests here and I assume some of the YouTube revenue helps to run this place.

I'm not sucking up but, I've seen too many forums destroyed because they didn't have a way to pay the bills. I'm all for it if it keeps the place afloat into the future. I'm not doing Reddit.

Also: the channel isn't only Ian Sandusky. Two videos they posted this week didn't have a single thing about Ian. They've also said numerous times that anyone interested in doing a video, a tour or whatever, is welcome.
 
Actually, have you really followed his channel, I watched it, that is not what he did. (took jobs, needed more machine, more jobs...) that isn't what he did at all.
He quickly became the poster boy for Tormach and switched his business to a Youtube channel, and training people on Tormach and Fusion.
He was never a job shop or etc.
I picked up watching his stuff heavily during Covid. I watched almost none of the Tormach stuff and only some of the Fusion. I'm a Fusion subscriber but, still rely on Solidworks and Mastercam.

The history I remember was from a video of him explaining how his move to his current location came about and some of the advice he was offering to other small startups. I admit it could be very self-serving and painting himself in a certain light but, that's not the impression I took from it.
 
We're all guests here and I assume some of the YouTube revenue helps to run this place.
Just a small but realistic correction : we are not guests. We are the fuel that gets burned to make the engine turn. This site exists for the purpose of making money. We supply the content, for free.

I'm not bitching but them's the facts, ma'am. Just the facts.
 
Don't forget that he's not Practical Machinist. He has his own channel, with almost 7K subscribers (Practical Machinist has ten times that).


Practical Machinist (whoever that is) is presumably who comes up with the ideas for videos. We're all guests here and I assume some of the YouTube revenue helps to run this place.

I'm not sucking up but, I've seen too many forums destroyed because they didn't have a way to pay the bills. I'm all for it if it keeps the place afloat into the future. I'm not doing Reddit.

Also: the channel isn't only Ian Sandusky. Two videos they posted this week didn't have a single thing about Ian. They've also said numerous times that anyone interested in doing a video, a tour or whatever, is welcome.

Nah, I see no reason for that level of assessment. I have no personal animosity toward Mr. Sandusky; nor any complaints about the quality of his content or monetization there of.

My grievance begins and ends with creating video content from the genuine dialogue generated by the membership of PM without participation.

For all we know, he may not have even considered how it is perceived; I am not accusing him of doing it maliciously.
 
My grievance begins and ends with creating video content from the genuine dialogue generated by the membership of PM without participation.
Totally guessing here but, for the amount of content PM has been putting together, I doubt the dude has the bandwidth to come on here and argue with us, travel around, shoot video and try to run his business back home too. :D

Thanks to @OVodov , YouTube is suggesting Seco videos now.

 
You don't like watching 20-something year old, man-bun wearing hipsters with sleeve tattoos restore old axes and make epoxy tables while trying to sell you their very own brand of beard balm?

Or how bout the young couples calling themselves "house flippers" while taking videos of themselves installing vinyl plank flooring and building "cute" wall features from pallet slats like they saw on tik-tak... no love for them either? Lol


Best youtube description I've ever heard!
"...restore old axes and make epoxy tables..." :D:D:D
Reminds me of the "hipster flyfishing invasion" (not coined by me, but I wish I had).
 
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to be fair, i learned a LOT from youtube. but not by taking things people on there say as gospel, more like inspiration to try different things on my own and figure out what works for me. so i definitely cant say that its ALL bad, but there is a LOT of cringe shit on there unfortunately :(

The only thing I've learned from youtube is that the Dunning-Kruger Effect is epidemic.

In fairness, there is a lot of content on youtube that I enjoy and appreciate, but very little of it is machining related.
 








 
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