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Just picked up a horizontal Mill, what kind is it?

So... Look at the back of the spindle. There may be a bolt head, or similar there which tightens a drawbar. It should unscrew, and will probably let you remove the large knurled item, probably leaving a flat end of spindle with a hole in it. The hole is probably tapered.

The nature of the hole, and what fits it is what needs to be known. Might be a B&S taper, might be a Morse taper like my horizontal. Or maybe something else.

The knurled item (chuck) is an add-on that fits the hole in the spindle. The taper of the spindle is the basic taer you need to match. With that known, all sorts of collets and adapters can likely be used. No need to match whatever the oddball collet you have is.

Getting the knurled part released from the tapered hole will probably need the drawbar unscrewed a bit, and then some controlled "tunking" on the end of the drawbar to pop the taper loose so it can be unscrewed the rest of the way from the drawbar, and pulled out.
 
The mill is missing something on the right hand side that probably had to do with the line shaft drive. The large concavity and empty slots on the rhs, I'm guessing, would have been for a 3 step flat belt cone and maybe a fast/loose pulley and belt shifter for connecting to the overhead shaft. I'm only pointing this out because the missing parts might make your mill harder to identify. Pretty sure it's not a Stark. The free-standing mills they made were built around lathe headstocks.
 
There's some grave similarity to the factory collet and chuck for a SB vertical mill - except the chuck collar is a bit different.
Can you extrapolate and guess whether the largest collet would hold a 3/4" shank?
Regardless the chuck source, i kind of doubt that it is original to the machine. They would typically have taken arbors with the male machine taper on one end, or spindle tooling on a male taper to go in the female mill taper.
Even the knurled collar chuck is suspect. Can you see an obvious way to remove it, such as a draw bar or bolt?
Well in case it wasn’t apparent, I know very little about mills in general, so please forgive my ignorance.
The “draw bar, I imagine is what’s going through the pulley’s essentially holding the end mill in the end. Yes, there is a big wheel opposite the milling end or “chuck”, this wheel has collars that are held on with little flat head screws, so I’m assuming they’re removable and the whole bar comes loose.? Again, I don’t know shit, so I will try to take some pics here and see if you can spot it.
 

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So... Look at the back of the spindle. There may be a bolt head, or similar there which tightens a drawbar. It should unscrew, and will probably let you remove the large knurled item, probably leaving a flat end of spindle with a hole in it. The hole is probably tapered.

The nature of the hole, and what fits it is what needs to be known. Might be a B&S taper, might be a Morse taper like my horizontal. Or maybe something else.

The knurled item (chuck) is an add-on that fits the hole in the spindle. The taper of the spindle is the basic taer you need to match. With that known, all sorts of collets and adapters can likely be used. No need to match whatever the oddball collet you have is.

Getting the knurled part released from the tapered hole will probably need the drawbar unscrewed a bit, and then some controlled "tunking" on the end of the drawbar to pop the taper loose so it can be unscrewed the rest of the way from the drawbar, and pulled out.
Yes. I just posted a response to another guy showing exactly what you just said. And yes, in the part where you put the end mill (with the chuck around it) does have what looks to be maybe a Jacob’s taper or Morse taper or whatever they’re called (low IQ when it comes to milling) interesting , so if I pull the drawbar that chuck thing is an add on? So long story short, can I just attach a collet holder and then use any size collet I want? I ordered some e12 ones I think? I calipered the hole, and ordered just one collet that had similar dimensions to what I needed, and it was an e20, not 12. Again, I’m pissing in the wind here, just learning from you guys so be easy on me.
So collet holder once I remove chuck? Or am I way off?
 
Upon re-reading (on my phone, and I’m near blind), I see that you answered any question I needed so my response was a little redundant.
Thank you. Now if we can figure out what the hell this machine is….. I’m still searching daily. Has a lot of “Atlas” attributes, but it’s not. Who knows, maybe it’s a 450 lb harbor freight mill? Shit with no logos at all on it , it’s kinda like they don’t want someone to know what it is?
 
Well in case it wasn’t apparent, I know very little about mills in general, so please forgive my ignorance.
The “draw bar, I imagine is what’s going through the pulley’s essentially holding the end mill in the end. Yes, there is a big wheel opposite the milling end or “chuck”, this wheel has collars that are held on with little flat head screws, so I’m assuming they’re removable and the whole bar comes loose.? Again, I don’t know shit, so I will try to take some pics here and see if you can spot it.
Oh, and the “hole” that holds the end mill, is a taper, like a Morse taper or something. Here’s a pic. Yes, I measured it by putting the calipers in it the right way, they’re just up like that for showing the numbers:)
Thoughts?
Just get a collet holder and be done with it or what?
 

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The mill is missing something on the right hand side that probably had to do with the line shaft drive. The large concavity and empty slots on the rhs, I'm guessing, would have been for a 3 step flat belt cone and maybe a fast/loose pulley and belt shifter for connecting to the overhead shaft. I'm only pointing this out because the missing parts might make your mill harder to identify. Pretty sure it's not a Stark. The free-standing mills they made were built around lathe headstocks.
Shit picture, but is this what you mean?
 

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So you got the chuck out?
or is that the tail end with the calipers?

If it is the tail end, you probably have to stick an aluminum or brass rod in and thump it to pop the chuck out the other end.

If it is the nose and the chuck and shank have been removed, measure the length, and the diameter at each end.
From dimension shown, it is probably a Jarno taper. (MT2 is too small, MT3 too large)
 
Re the collets, Maybe a y size double taper? or the old Schaublin e style if so maybe you could use er collets. Also. I think GregSY here on the forum had a set of Schaublin collets a couple of years ago and no way to use them.
 
Think like before electricity was invented....
And the major source of pollution in the world
was horse poop.


-Doozer
How is it
Line shaft. has a steam engine or waterwheel out back. It runs a drive shaft, the length of the building, hanging from the ceiling. Each machine has a belt up and over the line shaft to spin the machine. Slip the belt on and off to turn the machine on and off. Replaced by individual electric motors around 1920.
Bill D

Starts around 3:30
]
When mentioning line shafts dont forget David Richards.
 
Ok, so I removed the drawbar, which just had a threaded part on it. I took a pic of the hole I pulled the drawbar from (back of machine), the drawbar itself, and the collet chuck that is still in there because I can’t quite get it out yet. Man I’m getting confused. In the last 3 responses from you guys , there must be 30 different tapers available! How am I ever going to figure out what it is!
 
Re the collets, Maybe a y size double taper? or the old Schaublin e style if so maybe you could use er collets. Also. I think GregSY here on the forum had a set of Schaublin collets a couple of years ago and no way to use them.
You’re a genius!! Double y taper is it!! Thank you!!!!
 








 
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