What's new
What's new

Jones & Shipman 540 Grinder Questions

gradstdnt_99

Hot Rolled
Joined
Aug 17, 2004
Location
USA, Midwest
I recently purchased a Jones & Shipman 540 grinder. It dates back to 1988 and is both mechanically and cosmetically in very good shape. I'm located in the midwest and am seeking a good source for parts and a manual.

The unit I have has a hydraulic powered table as well as the power rise and fall option for the grinding head. The unit may also have an incremental downfeed as well, but don't know for sure. Anyone familiar with these things and how to identify exactly what I have. I'm familiar with descriptions of the 540 A AP APR designations but nowhere on the machine data tag does it list the exact model??? Will be some time before it gets fully cleaned and checked out and powered up.


Any assistance greatly appreciated...Thanks
 
What shape are the start stop buttons for the hydraulics and spindle?Round or square?Are they in the centre of the machine base or in a seperate panel on the side?
 
Machine has seperate electrical box attached to the lower left side of the base. Controls for spindle, coolant, and dust collector reside here. It also has the downfeed stop on the right side of the column. Downfeed has direct readings down to 0.00050" increments. It doesn't have the little flip levers on the downfeed wheel like the lathes UK site shows. It does have some sort of knob adjustment with locking ring on the bottom of the downfeed dial assembly. I believe the model shown on the lathes UK site are a bit older than the one I have. No power to machine nor any fluid in it. Will be a while before that happens. Trying to figure this thing out in the mean time.
 

Attachments

  • P1020285a.JPG
    P1020285a.JPG
    64.9 KB · Views: 2,359
If you scroll down about 2/3rds of the way down this page:-

http://www.lathes.co.uk/jonesandshipman/page4.html

you'll see the additional control on the vertical feed handwheel assembly that operates the automatic downfeed. If it's there on your machine, you've got automatic downfeed. Otherwise not:)

Hope that's of some help.

Never noticed that page before ...must be new

..
gradstdnt_99...
I would guess if you dint have the little flip levers ...it just has the power rise and fall and not the auto down feed....unless in that box on the side is some sort of electronic gizmo that does it all.

here's a pic of mine ...the auto downfeed unit controller is the triangular shaped thing on the side of the head ..

jsfinished2a.jpg


PS.. youre not missing much ...the power down feed actuates every left to right movement ...so is only of use for grinding stuff Less than the width of the wheel.


all the best.markj
 
Gradstdnt,
that`s the same model as mine with the seperate electrical box,but I don`t have powered rise and fall.They are quite simple to work,but there is a knock off for the power cross feed which is slightly different than years gone by.If I remember correctly a little button pops up when it hits the limits and this has to be pushed down again before it will re-engage.Other thing to remember is to pull the table hand wheel out of gear before engaging the long feed.There is an interlock on it.Doesn`t stop guys forcing it though.
If it was mine I would pull the hydraulic unit out the bottom and give it a good clean and fresh oil.
I`ve got a book somewhere so can tell you the grade of oil for the spindle if you need to know.
Mark.
 
Other thing to remember is to pull the table hand wheel out of gear before engaging the long feed.There is an interlock on it.Doesn`t stop guys forcing it though.


You woudn't believe that an animal that could bend a substantial brass handle would be let anywhere near a surface grinder (a second time:angry:), but it must be more common than I thought. Luckily, the hydraulic control block and the gear shift mechanism are quite solidly made. Here's my 1400 as I got it:-

handle.jpg
 
Mark, I've read up a bit on your efforts in the home machinist forum. Great job there. Here is a better picture of the machine.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/attachment.php?attachmentid=6704&stc=1&d=1223003224

Here are a few clues as to why I think it may have power downfeed but have yet to find documentation on it.
Control knob on front of machine base just right of the white cover plate. Down arrow and picture of downfeed dial.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/attachment.php?attachmentid=6701&stc=1&d=1223003224

What's behind the knob is some hydraulic circuits and some electrical contacts??? My guess is you pull the knob to turn on the small hydraulic pump located on the lower right hand side of the machine. These small hydraulic lines feed up to the handwheel???

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/attachment.php?attachmentid=6702&stc=1&d=1223003224

Also has downfeed limit switch. The spent carbide endmill used as a not so adjustable stop is in very poor form.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/attachment.php?attachmentid=6700&stc=1&d=1223003224

The description of auto downfeed not coupled with any cross feed seems to support the way this system is put together.

Machine came with original bill of sale and other misc documentation stuffed in the electrical cabinet. Back in 1988 machine sold for a bit over $22k. Chuck was another $1k and three wheel hubs just shy of another $1k.

Machine is currently dry with no oil in it. Will be some time before I complete cleaning this thing all up. Paint isn't bad but it's not the same standard as the rest of my shop. It has to come apart in order to go into my basement. Everything will be cleaned, inspected, and made to function as new. I derive great pleasure working with machines the look as good as they work.

Still looking for places that deal in spares. Do I need shop overseas??? Anyone supporting parts in the US.
 

Attachments

  • P1020567.JPG
    P1020567.JPG
    37.6 KB · Views: 1,793
  • P1020565.JPG
    P1020565.JPG
    60 KB · Views: 2,804
  • P1020563.JPG
    P1020563.JPG
    50.9 KB · Views: 2,267
  • P1020568.JPG
    P1020568.JPG
    59.3 KB · Views: 2,856
  • P1020578.JPG
    P1020578.JPG
    63.7 KB · Views: 8,949
yep

this pic confirms it has auto downfeed

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...1&d=1223003224

the big dial is quite different from my machine .

all the other boxes/enclosures .,......not quite sure why they are there ...

i would guess the motor starters have been moved to them, out of the original location in the old models (that's inside the main casting) ...because they are prone to collect grinding dust and burn out the contacts.

and more boxes and switches ...can make it looked souped up.... modernized ...different...and make JS more money on the sale.

all the best.markj
 
"i would guess the motor starters have been moved to them, out of the original location in the old models (that's inside the main casting) ...because they are prone to collect grinding dust and burn out the contacts."

It`s actually to meet the regs.Can`t remember if it`s CE or Electrical regs but you are not allowed switchgear inside machine castings now unless it`s dedicated.
 
The electrical box is quite full actually. Fuses, motor starter for main spindle, hydraulic pump, dust collector, and coolant system. I do have the coolant system but don't see using it in my home shop. I don't think electrical controls for the coolant and dust collector accessories were included in the older units. Although the exterior of the electical box was quite grimey, the inside is clean so the contactors should be long lived. Not having the controls in the base casting should make servicing the hydraulics easier. Taking the electrical box off to move it into my basement will be a pain.
 
It`s actually to meet the regs.Can`t remember if it`s CE or Electrical regs but you are not allowed switchgear inside machine castings now unless it`s dedicated.

You've got to appreciate that they are doing their best to protect us from something or other. But I'd far rather have the controls inside 3/8" of cast iron casting than in a folded tin box nailed to the side of said casting. It also doesn't look like they forgot to include them in the original design that way:soapbox:

I do have the coolant system but don't see using it in my home shop.

Your work and your shop will thank you for using the coolant. It makes quite a difference to the quality of work and makes a big difference to the amount of dust flying around the shop, unless you build a separate grinding room (dust extraction isn't perfect). It can pay to arrange an extractor fan to spread the atomized and evaporated coolant around the neighbourhood, but isn't vital.
 
I don`t use the coolant on mine as I`ve never got around to finding out why it trips the power when I use it,but,like Mark says finish is far superior with coolant and the machine stays cleaner and will probably last longer.
 
Does coolant put moisture into the air...uppping the humidity....thereby harming all your machine tools rather than protect one.

that's what scares me .

all the best.markj
 
It seems to make me smell of coolant and make the air feel "tacky" when I'm standing in front of the grinder for more than a couple of hours. Doesn't seem to encourage rust, because the atomized coolant dries to leave a trace of oil on whatever it lands on (me, it feels like). It is a very good idea to aim the coolant at the work near the wheel rather than the wheel near the work though. Otherwise the wheel will merrily tear the stream of coolant into a 60mph lumpy fog...


As I said, a bit of ventilation/extraction fan isn't a bad idea. But it's more because too much loose coolant will tend to make you feel a bit sticky rather than rotting all of the steel in the building.
 
I actually have two dust collectors and one is going to be dedicated to this machine. Grinding is going to be away from my other machines. May actually put in a curtain of some sort to prevent cross contamination. I have buffers, belt grinders and other gritty stuff in the same area. No doubt coolant will provide better results. I may need to go there in the future but as I learn and get up to speed, coolant seems to be a bit of a hassle.

Thanks so far for the assistance...
 
"stoopid question"... perhaps

Gents, sorry to be ignorant here, but could someone point me in the direction of a site that could show me clearly the scope of such a grinder? Just what is it capable of...limitations... any help, literature or otherwise would be great. Sorry to be so badly informed, but gotta start somewhere. Thanks
 
Hi everybody,

I've a J&S 540 AP , & use a 7" dia. grinding wheel , could anyone let me know which is the recommended thickness of wheel , so as not to overload the spindle, currently I use a 1/2" thich wheel , one to be on safer side.

Atul
 
one more Q,

my J&S 540 AP , is equipped with 2 speed motor, 1440 & 2880 rpm respectively , could any one help me regarding , speed selection for various jobs.
We are into stamping tools manufacturing .

Atul
 








 
Back
Top